The Sunday Salon สาธารณะ
[search 0]
เพิ่มเติม

ดาวน์โหลดแอปเลย!

show episodes
 
The Sunday Salon is a podcast celebrating brilliant books and the women who write them, hosted by journalist Alice-Azania Jarvis. Each week she chats to an inspiring female author about her work, her career, how she writes, what she reads and everything in between. This is not some academic textual analysis – it’s about finding the stories behind the stories. Tune in each Sunday to hear from guests including Isabel Allende, Jessie Burton, Holly Bourne, Diana Evans, Elizabeth Day, Nimco Ali a ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
Tahmima Anam has had a fascinating life. Born in Bangladesh, she has lived in Paris, New York and Bangkok - and is now based in the UK. Her first novel, A Golden Age (2007), won the Commonwealth Writers Prizes' Best First Book award and launched a highly acclaimed trilogy concerned with telling the history of Bangladesh as an independent nation. He…
 
Elif Shafak is - among other things - an activist, public speaker and academic with a PhD in political science who teaches at universities in Turkey, the US and the UK. She is also the author of an incredible 12 novels which have been translated into 55 languages. Her most recent novel, The Island of Missing Trees, is a sweeping story of intergener…
 
Hello and welcome to a new series of the Sunday Salon! I've got so many fantastic guests coming up - and today's episode is particularly special. Emily Ratajkowski is a model, activist and actress - and now the author of My Body, a collection of essays reflecting on her position in the spotlight and how her appearance has shaped people's behaviours…
 
Right, I'm off to enjoy my honeymoon (yes, all being well, by the time you read this I will be one day into married life). But I'm leaving you with a joy of an episode. I loved this book. The Troubles with Us: One Belfast Girl on Boys, Bombs and Finding Her Way is a brilliant memoir by Alix O'Neill about her time growing up in Northern Ireland. Tak…
 
Today's episode was such a joy to record - Phoebe Luckhurst is an editor at the Evening Standard newspaper, and also the author of The Lock In, a totally fun indulgence of a book about what happens when three housemates (and a date) find themselves trapped in the attic of their house share. Phoebe is such a clever writer - she has managed to work i…
 
This was such a fun interview! Olivia Petter is a podcasting phenomenon and the author of Millennial Love, a kind of modern anthropological anthology of what dating and relationships are like now. From apps to ghosting and how social media can affect both the beginning - and end - of relationships, to how the MeToo movement changed ordinary women's…
 
I loved this conversation: Nadifa Mohamed is an award-winning novelist whose most recent book The Fortune Men is a dazzling account of the real-life events surrounding the wrongful imprisonment and execution of a Somali seaman and father, who was the last man to be hanged in Cardiff prison. Set in Tiger Bay in the 1950s and fusing historical report…
 
Today's guest is the absolutely brilliant Bella Mackie, author of the fabulous and funny new novel How To Kill Your Family. You may also know her non-fiction work, particularly her phenomenally successful memoir Jog On, which chronicled how taking up running after her first marriage collapsed helped manage her anxiety. It was a bestseller, and she …
 
​I​'m so​,​ so excited for you to hear today's episode. L​i​sa Taddeo is a phenomenon. She shot to fame as the author of Three Women, which covers the sexual and emotional lives of three women from different backgrounds and regions of the United States. It was described as ​'groundbreaking​'​, ​'​seminal​'​ and having created a ​whole ​new genre. N…
 
I'm so happy to be back - and I'm so excited about today's guest. Natasha Lunn is a journalist and the author of Conversations On Love, an absolutely gorgeous book in which she interviews authors and experts, while also drawing on her own experience in a series of riveting personal essays. She asks three key questions: how do we find love? How do w…
 
Where to start with this? I absolutely loved Malibu Rising. A heady mix of 80s Malibu and 60s Hollywood, it’s an absolute blast to read. But then I shouldn’t be surprised - after all, it was written by Taylor Jenkins Reid, author of 2019’s smash-hit Daisy Jones and the six. I just adored speaking to her about it, as well as hearing about her unconv…
 
I’m not sure you could have come up with a more ambitious task than Kat Arney set herself when she decided to write her most recent book Rebel Cell: Cancer, Evolution and the Science of Life, in which she looks at the history of cancer in the human race, as well as how we tend to view, prevent and treat it today. It’s not her first massive challeng…
 
Dima Alzayat has had a fascinating life. Born in Damascus, Syria, she grew up in California before moving to the UK to study creative writing. Her collection of short stories Alligator and Other Stories is a riveting read, in which she ranges across genres and formats in a way I’ve not seen before. I loved talking to her about this - hearing about …
 
This was such a fun episode to record. Katie Service is a former makeup artist and beauty editor who is now Editorial Beauty Director at Harrods - and the author of The Beauty Brief: An Insider's Guide to Skincare. She’s also an old colleague of mine - we worked together on ES magazine, where she became my go-to guru for anything vaguely beauty rel…
 
This was such a fun conversation. After becoming fascinated by an old photo taken on the island of Hydra in Greece, Polly Samson set about researching the lives of the musicians, writers and artists who settled there in the 1960s, from Marianne Ihlen and Leonard Cohen to the writers Charmian Clift and George Johnston. Her novel, A Theatre For Dream…
 
I absolutely loved interviewing today's guest. Jenny Kleeman is a journalist and broadcaster and the author of Sex Robots & Vegan Meat: Adventures at the frontier of Birth, Food, Sex, and Death, which has just come out in paperback. The book is utterly riveting - Jenny travels all over the place talking to those at the forefront of some of the worl…
 
This was such an interesting conversation. Natalie Morris is a journalist and the author of Mixed/Other: Explorations of Multiraciality in Modern Britain, which draws on her own life experience as well as dozens of interviews to examine the mixed experience. From why she uses the term mixed, rather than mixed race, to the problem with brands' curre…
 
Katherine Faulkner has had such a fascinating career. A former investigative journalist at the Daily Mail, she used to go undercover to get to the heart of her stories. Then she went on to become joint head of news at The Times - and while on maternity leave wrote her first book, Greenwich Park, an absolutely gripping thriller about toxic relations…
 
If you’re feeling a little cooped up after a year in lockdown, then this is the episode for you. Kate Wills is a travel writer and columnist and the author of A Trip of One's Own: Hope, heartbreak and why travelling solo could change your life. I absolutely gobbled up this book - not just because Kate has such a warm, easygoing writing style but al…
 
This week's guest is the journalist Gaby Hinsliff, former political editor of the Observer and now a columnist and writer for the Guardian and others. This was such a dream interview in so many ways - I've admired Gaby's journalism for years, and I loved her book Half a Wife: The Working Family's Guide to Getting a Life Back when it came out nine y…
 
One day, when her son Cato was three months old, Catherine Cho looked at him and, instead of his eyes, she saw devil eyes. She and her husband James had taken Cato to the US from their home in London to introduce him to relatives. She grew gradually more anxious as the trip went on, before being hit by a tidal wave of postpartum psychosis, becoming…
 
We have a term for our teenage years - ‘adolescence’ - and we are all familiar with the ‘menopause’ - but there’s no word for the decade or so in which, arguably, women navigate more life-altering decisions than any other - their late 20s and 30s. Or at least there wasn’t, until Nell Frizzell came along and coined one: ‘the flux’, aka The Panic Yea…
 
Still WFH? The food writer Rebecca Seal has been doing it for more than a decade. Six years ago, however, she reached something close to breaking point: working until eight or nine at night, six days a week (plus Sunday mornings, when she’s a regular on brunch TV). So she and her partner decided to change things. They set rules: no working or talki…
 
Sarah Sands is a media industry legend. A trailblazer for women in journalism, she has had one of the most glittering careers it’s possible to have - editing two newspapers before going on to head up BBC Radio 4’s flagship current affairs programme, Today. Having left that role last year, she’d be forgiven for putting her feet up. But no - she has …
 
I’ve wanted to interview Sarra Manning since I started this podcast - for many reasons. She’s a fab writer, a huge supporter of other authors, has tonnes of brilliant writing and publishing advice (seriously, this episode features some of the most original, no-nonsense and practical tips I’ve ever had). But also: she was the brains behind J-17’s le…
 
Lockdown and drinking go together like wine and cheese...or do they? Given the unusual situation we find ourselves in, perhaps it’s not surprising that booze sales have rocketed. However Millie Gooch knows the problems with using alcohol as a coping mechanism only too well. After finding that her binge drinking was leaving her poleaxed by anxiety s…
 
Brita Fernandez Schmidt is a phenomenon. The Executive Director of Women for Women International UK, she has spent her adult life fighting for women’s rights around the world. The charity specialises in working with women in conflict zones, offering a year-long training programme to build support networks and develop skills that will help earn mone…
 
This is not a Valentine's special - but it is a love story, in its own way. Or at least, a story of how someone left behind the hate they'd grown up with. Ok, this is all getting a bit cryptic, so let me explain: Megan Phelps-Roper is a former member of the Westboro Baptist Church. Growing up in Kansas, she lived in a compound with other members an…
 
A bidding war, a screen adaptation by the director who made “Chernobyl” - and now, a place on the bestseller lists. What a whirlwind few months it has been for Abigail Dean and her debut novel, Girl A, which documents the aftermath of the horrific abuse the narrator, Lex (aka ‘Girl A’) endured at the hand of her father. Obviously, I was thrilled to…
 
What a fascinating life Carys has led. Brought up in a strict Mormon family in Southport, she was married by 20, and had five children within seven years before deciding to leave behind her faith and study creative writing. Her first novel, 2014’s A Song for Issy Bradley, won widespread acclaim and was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel. Since t…
 
This was SUCH a fun, funny and fascinating conversation. Jessica Fellowes is a journalist and the author of books ranging from Mud and the City: Dos and Don'ts for Townies in the Country to her wildly successful series of Mitford Murders books, which fuse historical fact and fiction. Our conversation was as varied and quirky as that output suggests…
 
I absolutely loved Cecily von Ziegesar’s Cobble Hill. It’s really funny and quirky and smart without being heavy-going; full of subtle social satire and astute observation. It was particularly pleasing as Cecily is best known for writing the Gossip Girl books, which in turn launched the hugely successful TV show - and I was a mega Gossip Girl fan w…
 
There was no way I could turn down the chance to interview the editor in chief of Hello! - apart from anything else, I knew she’d have brilliant anecdotes. And Rosie Nixon didn’t disappoint - I loved hearing how she and her staff put together their iconic Royal Wedding issues, as well as what it was like to attend Robbie Williams’ wedding to Ayda F…
 
I took Emma Rowley’s You Can Trust Me away on holiday to Wales and I gulped it down in one sitting. It’s a really smart, grabby thriller about a ghostwriter who spends a week at the luxurious home of an influencer whose autobiography she is meant to be writing - only for things to take a very dark turn. It’s a great read, and I knew I had to speak …
 
Was 2020 the least sexy year ever? Quite possibly - thanks to casual sex bans and social distancing. But was it on track to be that way anyway? These are questions examined in Mia Levitin’s The Future of Seduction, which looks at the multifaceted ways in which phones and tech have changed romance, the effect of MeToo on flirting and courtship, and …
 
I first interviewed Kelleigh back in February 2020 - and then the pandemic hit in earnest. We weren’t sure what to do: whether to ignore the fact that half of her answers now felt out of date, or to do it all again. I’m so glad we went for the latter, I wanted to hear how the pandemic experience had affected her life and her writing style. As a US …
 
When Sarah Perry would tell people she was an Essex Girl, her remarks would be met with a knowing smirk. Why? That question is at the heart of this book, which pinpoints what it is that makes an Essex girl (not white high-heels - but a chutzpah and convention-defying radicalism). Perry - the author of three wildly successful novels, After Me Comes …
 
Otegha Uwagba is an inspiration. Aged 25, fed up with her job in advertising, she quit and decided to establish herself as a freelance writer, setting up the networking platform Women Who, and self-publishing Little Black Book: A Toolkit For Working Women. After a sell-out print run, it was snapped up by a publisher and became a Sunday Times best-s…
 
On a chilly autumn afternoon, I picked up Kenya Hunt’s Girl: Essays on Black Womanhood - and didn’t put it down until it was way past my bedtime. It’s a totally compelling and gripping read, combining social observation, cultural criticism, history and rich personal anecdotes to examine different elements of black womanhood and the black experience…
 
We are back! Welcome to series three of the Sunday Salon - and I’m kicking the new season off with a really special guest: the one and only Grace Dent, restaurant critic, columnist, novelist, TV personality and now, memoirist. Her new book Hungry: A memoir of wanting more is undoubtedly one of my reads of the year. Taking in Grace’s childhood in Ca…
 
So - it's the final episode of season two, my 76th episode - and my 24th lockdown isolationcast! Thank you so much for bearing with me as I've done the podcast remotely in this way. My guest today is Rebcca Ley, whose debut novel For When I'm Gone is a hugely moving and yet also uplifting look at family, motherhood, grief and love. Rebecca was such…
 
As some of you know, I was meant to be getting married next weekend. I'm not anymore - we've postponed - but as it happens this episode has a bit of wedding theme, since Luminary Bakery are making my cake! More importantly, they have also just published a brilliant new cookbook, Rising Hope: Recipes and Stories from Luminary Bakery. If you aren't f…
 
My guest today has had the most phenomenal life. Xiaolu Guo was born in a fishing village in the south of China. She grew up with her grandparents, until she was seven when she went to live with her parents in a communist-era compound. She studied film in Beijing, then moved London in 2002. Five years later her first English Language novel A Concis…
 
My guest this week is someone I have wanted to interview for absolutely ages. Ever since her debut novel My Name is Leon was published in 2016, Kit de Waal has been one of the most thoughtful and interesting voices in the industry. Having crowdfunded and edited an anthology of working class memoir, Common People, she has spoken frequently of the ne…
 
This conversation was utterly fascinating. As you know, I've been asking all my guests for a few of their isolation stories. Well, today's guest has a particularly interesting tale. After going through New York's long and grueling lockdown, Frances Cha has moved to South Korea, where she always spends the summer, and had a very different experience…
 
I am so excited about this week's episode - it's actually the second time that Emma has been on The Sunday Salon. Last time, we were discussing her hugely successful book The Multi-Hyphen Method, about combining different jobs into one career. Now she's back - with a novel: the smart, warm, refreshing Olive, about a woman whose friends who are sett…
 
I am so excited that my guest this week is the journalistic legend that is Alexandra Shulman. As well as being British Vogue's longest serving editor in chief (she ran the title for more than 25 years), she is the author of two novels, as well as Inside Vogue: My Diary Of Vogue's 100th Year and most recently, Clothes And Other Things That Matter, a…
 
I am so delighted that my guest this week is Pandora Sykes, whose new book, How Do We Know We're Doing It Right? Essays on Modern Life, is a thought-provoking and insightful dissection of contemporary fads and foibles - from wellness and self-optimisation, to our urge to appear "authentic" even when doing so is in itself superficial and so much mor…
 
Fashion! Psychodrama! Jealousy! Harriet Walker's debut novel The New Girl has it all. A psychological thriller about the relationship between a magazine's fashion editor and her maternity cover, I could not put it down - and I'm not surprised that it is one of the year's most buzzed-about books. As you can imagine, I was delighted to have the chanc…
 
Loading …

คู่มืออ้างอิงด่วน

Google login Twitter login Classic login