Rabbi Eli J Mansour สาธารณะ
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Is it permissible to travel on a boat during Shabbat, if one boarded the ship before Shabbat? Clearly, one may not ride on a boat on Shabbat if the captain or crew members are Jews who do not observe Shabbat. Since the trip entails Shabbat desecration by Jews, it is forbidden to participate in the voyage. This is the ruling of Hacham Ovadia Yosef i…
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If a boat reached its port on Shabbat, it is permitted to disembark on Shabbat. Assuming that the boat travelled across water deeper than 10 Tefahim (handbreadths), there is no issue of Tehum Shabbat (leaving the boundaries of Shabbat). Accordingly, the Jewish passengers are considered residents of the port city and can freely walk its entire domai…
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The question was raised whether it is permitted to board a boat on Shabbat in order to perform a misva. This was an actual issue for Jews in Turnberry, who wanted to cross the inter-coastal waterway via ferry in order to reach Shul on Shabbat morning. The Halacha clearly states that is prohibited to board a boat on Shabbat, even for the purpose of …
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The Halacha prohibits boarding a boat within three days of Shabbat for a journey through Shabbat. This restriction only applies to travel not for the purpose of a misva. For example, one is allowed to embark even on Friday afternoon to make Aliya to Eres Yisrael. Business travel, on the other hand, is not considered a misva purpose in this context.…
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The Minhat Yishak (Rav Yishak Weiss, 1901-1989) addresses the situation of people who live on an island and thus frequently travel by ferry through waterways. He writes that since the ordinary mode of travel for such people is by ferry, and this is how they get to the places they need to go on a day-to-day basis, they do not recite Birkat Ha’gomel …
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One of the situations requiring the recitation of Birkat Ha’gomel is a journey in the ocean. The chapter of Tehillim which discusses the obligation of Birkat Ha’gomel describes the situation of "Yoredeh Ha’yam Ba’oniyot Oseh Melacha Be’mayim Rabim" ("Those who descend into the ocean in ships; who do their work in the high seas" – Tehillim 107:23). …
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Customarily, when somebody needs to recite Birkat Ha'gomel after emerging safely from a dangerous situation, he recites the Beracha in the synagogue, when the Sefer Torah is read. However, this is not strictly required, and the Beracha may also be recited at other times, as long as a Minyan is present. The Hatam Sofer (Rav Moshe Sofer of Pressburg,…
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One of the dangerous situations requiring the recitation of Birkat Ha'gomel is a sea voyage. A person who traveled by sea must recite Birkat Ha'gomel after reaching dry land, to express gratitude to G-d for bringing him safely through the ocean. Hacham Ovadia Yosef ruled that this applies also to somebody who swims in the ocean – or even in a lake,…
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Rav Shemuel Pinhasi (contemporary), in his work Ve'chol Ha'haim (p. 31; listen to audio recording for precise citation), discusses the situation of a traveler who completes a long journey (72 minutes or longer) but has not yet arrived at his final destination. He uses the example of a passenger who flies from Israel to the United States where he is…
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If a child below the age of Bar-Misva experiences a situation of danger that for an adult would require the recitation of Birkat Ha'gomel – such as being bedridden with an illness, or traveling overseas – does he recite this Beracha? The Magen Abraham (Rav Abraham Gombiner, 1633-1683), in Siman 219, cites the ruling of the Mahari Mintz (Rav Yehuda …
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Halacha follows the opinion that "Misvot Serichot Kavana" – meaning, one who performs a Misva must have this purpose in mind in order to fulfill his obligation. Thus, for example, before one begins reciting Shema, he must pause and think for a moment in his mind that he prepares to fulfill the Torah obligation to recite the daily Shema. This applie…
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If one has a close friend or family member who is gravely ill and enduring a great deal of suffering, and the physicians have determined that the patient cannot be cured, it is permissible, or proper, to pray that the patient should die so he does not suffer any longer? A possible Talmudic source for this kind of prayer is the story told in Maseche…
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The Torah establishes in the Book of Devarim (21:17) that a father must "recognize" ("Yakir") the distinction of his firstborn son by awarding him a double portion in the inheritance. Thus, for example, if a man had three sons, after his death his estate is divided into four portions, two of which are awarded to the firstborn; each of the other two…
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Can a person write a will calling for his assets to be distributed after his passing in a different manner than that prescribed by the Torah? According to Torah law, ownership over a person's assets is transferred automatically after his passing to his family members in the sequence stipulated by Halacha. This automatic transfer of assets does not …
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If a person passes away without leaving a will, the distribution of his estate is subject to a very specific system outlined by Halacha, which generally differs from the state laws regarding inheritance. We briefly outline here the basic rules of inheritance that apply when a person passes on without leaving a will: 1) A wife does not inherit her h…
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Halacha forbids eating before praying Shaharit in the morning, both on Shabbat and on weekdays. Eating before praying is considered a sign of arrogance, as one's first order of business in the morning should be praying to Hashem. Of course, an ill patient who needs to eat to sustain himself is permitted to eat, as this clearly does not express any …
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As discussed in a previous edition of Daily Halacha, it is forbidden to eat or drink anything from the time Shabbat begins on Friday afternoon until one recites (or hears) Kiddush. Even water is forbidden. This prohibition begins when a person accepts the onset of Shabbat, or at sundown, whichever comes first. We noted there the lenient ruling of H…
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Rabbi Akiva Eger (1761-1837), in one of his responsa (7), addresses the question of whether a woman can fulfill her obligation of Kiddush by hearing the recitation from a boy who has just become a Bar Misva. A boy becomes obligated in Misvot as an adult once he reaches physical maturity, and with many thirteen-year-old boys, it is uncertain whether…
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