Jeffery Saddoris สาธารณะ
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In this episode, Sean and I are talking about output, not in terms of what we produce, but how the work we make is presented to an audience. For example, are you only sharing your work online, or do you also make prints. Maybe you make photobooks or show your work in galleries. How our work appears out in the world can have a dramatic effect on how…
 
In this episode, Sean and I are talking about meeting our heroes and how the outcome of those meetings can often affect how we are able to see and connect with the work they make. We also talk about the importance of finding that thing or maybe multiple things that light you up and you do simply for the fun or the joy of it. CONNECT WITH SEANWebsit…
 
In this episode, Sean and I are talking about a photo essay that raised some interesting questions for each of us, such as how do you respond to an artist’s newer work when it doesn’t hit you the same way their earlier work did? Have they changed or have you? Or is it some of each? And how much should the context of the work matter to how it lands …
 
A few episodes back, Sean and I were talking about social media and Sean mentioned that Ben Horne, who is a terrific large format landscape photographer I spoke to on Process Driven 41, had left Twitter and Instagram and was just focusing on the community he had on YouTube. I reached out to Ben to see if he’d like to come on the show to talk about …
 
In this episode of Deep Natter, Sean and I are continuing a previous discussion about finding our why around the things we make. Sometimes, it’s easy to lose our way and we end up needing to make a few tweaks or even a hard reset to get us back in the groove. LINKSPrimordial (Jeff Lemire)Gideon FallsSweet Tooth (Netflix)Sweet Tooth (Comic)Monsters …
 
In this episode of Deep Natter, one of Sean’s Instagram accounts got hacked, which has us talking about to what degree we’re comfortable relying on social media platforms as the main place to share our work and connect with an audience. Plus, a new HBO Documentary about social media sparks a chat about a growing number of influencers who want littl…
 
In this episode, Sean and I are talking about owning the things we make. What I mean by that is that we stand behind our art and put our voice, our process, and ourselves first, before we worry about packaging it, branding it, or marketing it to an audience. CONNECT WITH SEANWebsite: http://seantucker.photographyTwitter: @seantuckInstagram: @seantu…
 
This is actually episode 10.5 or “10 Take Two” of Deep Natter, since we had a little bit of a power outage situation and had to record this week’s show a second time. It actually worked out for the best though, since it gave Sean and me time to think about the subject matter a little more and dive just a bit deeper into discussing it. LINKSMy Life …
 
Sean is going to be doing a new project with one of his oldest friends, so in this episode we’re talking about podcasting, both from the side of the listener and also from the perspective of the producer. Plus, Sean shares a bit of the beauty and the complexity of his early life growing up in South Africa. CONNECT WITH SEANWebsite: http://seantucke…
 
In this episode, Sean and I are talking about collaboration and finding your voice and to help us illustrate some of this, we’re going to be talking about a terrific HBO documentary from 2017 called Spielberg. While the film is ostensibly about Steven Spielberg and how became one of the greatest directors of all time, largely pulling from his own l…
 
Sean Tucker has just released a new book called The Meaning in the Making. Over twelve chapters, using stories from his own life, as well as references from literature, art, philosophy, and religion, Sean attempts to understand and explain “the why and how behind our human need to create.” I’ve been lucky enough to hear little snippets here and the…
 
In this episode, Sean Tucker and I are talking about some of the challenges of bringing focus back from our various social media platforms to our own websites, which in many ways are the only places we have online that allow us to really curate how our work is presented to an audience. We also talk about how much we miss communities and how easy it…
 
In this episode, we’re talking about chasing objective good in art making and selling out to please an audience versus making strategic choices to keep an audience engaged with the work we make. We also share a few things you might want to check out to help level up your inspiration. SHOW NOTES The Rewatchables Podcast The Game The Revanent Barry L…
 
In this episode, Sean talks about a recent trip to London where he may have had his most productive day of photography ever, which is a pretty bold statement. We also talk about the importance of inspirational friends as well as our shared appreciation for the work of Richard Avedon, Don McCullin, and Sally Mann. CONNECT WITH SEAN Website: http://s…
 
The other day I was on the phone with Bill Wadman and it didn’t take long before Bill asked “wait, should we be rolling tape on this?” When you’ve recorded 1000 or so hours with someone, the answer is usually yes. I just wish we had been rolling from the beginning, because when Bill called, he asked what I was doing and I said that I was listening …
 
Brooke Shaden is one of a select few artists who manages to consistently create work that is so visceral and resonates so deeply that it makes me want to step into the picture so I can inhabit that world, even for a moment. Her work is sometimes haunting, sometimes dark, sometimes disturbing, but always interesting and challenging enough, both conc…
 
In this episode, Sean and I are talking about the idea of revisiting older work. Some people find value in looking back over what they’ve done, while others never do and instead are always looking to what comes next. While Sean and I have a few similarities around it, there are definitely some differences in how each of us relates to our previous b…
 
In this episode of Deep Natter, Sean Tucker and I are talking about perfection. They say that practice makes perfect, but I think as makers, deep down most of us know that perfect really doesn’t exist. Good? Sure. Great? Maybe, occasionally. But perfect? Not in my experience. So why do we keep chasing it? Well, that’s exactly what Sean and I are go…
 
In this episode of Deep Natter, Sean Tucker and I are talking about effort, specifically whether and how and to what degree effort is connected to the value of the things we make. To help illustrate how effort can affect or influence the end product, we refer to a couple terrific films by Werner Herzog, including one that involved literally draggin…
 
In this debut episode of Deep Natter, Sean Tucker and I are talking about long-term projects and curating our own work. Each of us have been circling a personal project for years and as luck would have it, coming out of a global pandemic was just the catalyst we needed to stop thinking and start doing. We also talk about the importance of making th…
 
Lately, I seem to be having more and more conversations with people who have really started taking a long look back on their lives to try to determine to what degree anything they’ve done matters and whether or not it will keep mattering after they’ve gone. For many of them, these musings revolve around a major accomplishment or a specific body of …
 
I think one of the things that made Father Bill Moore so important to me was the fact that he was one of a small group of non-family members and non-friends to say that I had talent as a painter and that I had something to say with my work and he was one of an even smaller group of people who I would consider a mentor in my life. This is probably s…
 
I think one of the things that made Father Bill Moore so important to me was the fact that he was one of a small group of non-family members and non-friends to say that I had talent as a painter and that I had something to say with my work and he was one of an even smaller group of people who I would consider a mentor in my life. This is probably s…
 
I think Ben Horne and I first talked about recording together in 2018, not long after I was introduced to his work. But as John Lennon famously said, “Life is what happens when you’re making other plans” and for one reason or another, we just couldn’t get our schedules in sync, but I am so grateful that we were able to circle back around and make t…
 
While I’ve never really done one myself — not intentionally anyway — I am fascinated by long-term creative projects. I find the whole idea of intentionally and purposefully immersing yourself in something you know is going to take years to realize both inspiring and a little terrifying. But I guess if you find the right project, the challenges, obs…
 
In the middle of 2019, Netflix launched a show called Blown Away, which is a competition show for glass artists. The promos looked terrific and I think Adrianne and I were hooked from pretty much the first episode. We binged the whole season and it became our go to recommendation for our Netflix-watching friends. I even reached out to Alex Rosenber…
 
As many of you know, I currently produce three different podcasts, each with a different format and purpose. Process Driven is a deep-dive conversation with a single artist to talk about what they do and why they do it. In Between is a conversation with a recurring group of co-hosts around a single topic or theme. Iterations is my audio journal — i…
 
In Process Driven 37, I had part one of this two-part conversation with Documentarist, Jack Lowe. And while you don’t need to have listened to part one to enjoy this conversation, I invite you to go back and listen to it if you haven’t. Among other things, we talked about the origins of Jack’s Lifeboat Station Project, which has him traveling to al…
 
At the beginning of the year, I released an episode called Setting the Intention for 2021, and one of the things I talked about was how I wanted to make some changes to my shows, both in who I approach to record with and in how I actually produce and edit the episodes, for example using music and sound effects to enhance the ambience or atmosphere …
 
One of the hardest things about being an artist — beyond the actual making of the art — is deciding how to value the work we make. For many of us — and I’m putting myself squarely in the middle on this — the art I make is very personal, even though visually it may not seem like it. And, if I’m being honest, it’s not just the art, but the design, th…
 
Like many of you, I could not be happier to finally be rid of the raging dumpster fire that was 2020. I know the next year will be anything but easy, but I am cautiously optimistic that 2021 will be filled with new possibilities and chances to do things a little differently than last year. I started doing yoga about a month ago and Adrianne reminde…
 
Like many of you, I could not be happier to finally be rid of the raging dumpster fire that was 2020. I know the next year will be anything but easy, but I am cautiously optimistic that 2021 will be filled with new possibilities and chances to do things a little differently than last year. I started doing yoga about a month ago and Adrianne reminde…
 
If you were an On Taking Pictures listener, you know how all over the place some of the conversations with Bill Wadman and me tended to get and this one is no exception. We talk a little about gear, a little about process and a little about whatever tangent we happen to feel like following. In other words, just a normal chat between friends who hav…
 
I was talking to Sean Tucker the other day and I don’t remember what prompted it, but he asked me whether I’d seen some of the recent work our friend Maarten Rots was sharing on Instagram. I told him that I had and that it was terrific. “But do you know how he’s doing it?” Sean gave me a brief description of what was going on in the pictures and af…
 
There are only a handful of photographers whose work is instantly recognizable and fewer still who have become a genre unto themselves. I was first introduced to the pictures of Gregory Crewdson through a body of work called Beneath the Roses. I felt instantly connected to that world he so meticulously crafted and I’ve been a huge admirer of his wo…
 
A few months ago I was out on a morning walk with Adrianne and got a call from a familiar voice. Since then we’ve spoken a few times and thought why not roll tape on one and see where it goes. Today seemed as good a day as any to do just that. Here’s a brand new conversation between me and Bill Wadman. SHOW NOTES Beetlejuice – https://www.imdb.com/…
 
If you’re listening to this show, or any of my shows really, chances are you are a maker of some sort. And if you are, I bet on at least a few occasions over the past several months, you’ve had one of those days. The days where at best it’s hard to stay focused on the making and at worst you’re asking yourself why the fuck you should even get out o…
 
If you’re listening to this show, or any of my shows really, chances are you are a maker of some sort. And if you are, I bet on at least a few occasions over the past several months, you’ve had one of those days. The days where at best it’s hard to stay focused on the making and at worst you’re asking yourself why the fuck you should even get out o…
 
I don’t remember how it came up but I was talking to Sean Tucker a while back and we ended up talking about different photographers that we had found recently and he asked me whether I’d seen the work of Maria Lax. Maria is a Finnish photographer based in London who had published a book called Some Kind of Heavenly Fire. Honestly the title alone wa…
 
I spend a lot of time thinking about materials and objects as they relate to art and art making and I spend a fair bit of time talking about it with Jon. In this conversation, we’re talking about some of our first memories of art and of objects that we somehow recognized as “special.” We also talk about the how the contrast between the refinement o…
 
This is an experiment. Growing up, I can’t remember not having a radio in one form or another. The first one I remember was a big walnut console with a turn table and a television that we had in our house in either San Dimas or Azusa — that part’s a little fuzzy but it had to be the early 70s. I also remember a little Panasonic clock radio my mom h…
 
If you’ve listened to any of my shows before, you know that I spend a fair bit of time talking about creativity, both in the literal and in the abstract. I’m fascinated by how and why we create. Why for some, the need to express who they — we — are is as important to the human experience as taking a breath. Questions around creativity inform many o…
 
If you’ve listened to any of my shows before, you know that I spend a fair bit of time talking about creativity, both in the literal and in the abstract. I’m fascinated by how and why we create. Why for some, the need to express who they — we — are is as important to the human experience as taking a breath. Questions around creativity inform many o…
 
When I was a kid, my mom used to say that if the house ever caught fire, the one thing she would grab before anything else was the box of family photos that she kept in her closet, which I’m sure was common for many of us before analog became digital. For my mom, those photos were the things — the objects —that she held most dear, more than jewelry…
 
At the end of May, I decided to take a break from social media so I could focus on making without the constant background noise that seemed to be sucking the life out the urge to create anything. It was a self-imposed blackout that I hoped would allow at least some of the creative light back in. Inspired by a recent documentary, I decided to work o…
 
There’s something about wet plate photography that I can’t get out of my head. Maybe it’s the process, maybe it’s the unpredictable nature of it – Sally Mann calls it “the angel of uncertainty.” Or maybe it’s the permanence of the objects themselves. When you look at a plate by Matthew Brady or Timothy O’Sullivan, for a moment you’re no longer part…
 
Last week, I decided to take a much needed break from social media. There’s just too much going on in the world that pulls my focus away from the areas of my life that really warrant – and frankly need – that focus – specifically my family and my art. In my final Instagram post before the break, I wrote that I wasn’t who I wanted to be lately follo…
 
What happens next? That’s the question isn’t it? It’s something I get asked a lot, especially lately, both from friends and from strangers. I wish I had an answer but honestly I’m still spending a fair bit of time struggling to answer “what now?” I’m sure most of you are thinking about it too and maybe you even have an answer. Eventually, we’ll all…
 
What happens next? That’s the question isn’t it? It’s something I get asked a lot, especially lately, both from friends and from strangers. I wish I had an answer but honestly I’m still spending a fair bit of time struggling to answer “what now?” I’m sure most of you are thinking about it too and maybe you even have an answer. Eventually, we’ll all…
 
As much as I love working with acrylics in my paintings, because many of them are literally dozens of layers of pigment, collage, found objects, and thick layers of acrylic medium, it can take weeks to finish a single piece just waiting for layers to dry. A few years ago, I began looking into using encaustic, which offers the ability to create work…
 
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