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Host Unknown is the unholy alliance of the old, the new and the rockstars of the infosec industry in an internet-based show that tries to care about issues in our industry. It regularly fails. With presenters that have an inflated opinion of their own worth and a production team with a pathological dislike of them (or “meat puppets” as it often refers to them), it is with a combination of luck and utter lack of good judgement that a show is ever produced and released. Host Unknown is availab ...
 
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This Week in InfoSec (04:09) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 16th September 2008: 20-year-old David Kernell compromised the Yahoo! email account of US vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin, then posted her emails to 4chan. 2 years later he was found guilty and sentenced to a year in prison. At age 30 he died of …
 
This Week in InfoSec (11:14) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 5th September 1983: The term "hacker" was used by Newsweek, mainstream media's earliest known use of the term in the pejorative sense. The magazine's cover photo of 17-year-old 414s (hacker group) member Neal Patrick was captioned '414 "Hacker" Neal Patr…
 
This Week in InfoSec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 1st September 1997: Nmap was first released as a simple port scanner via an article in issue 51 of Phrack magazine which included the source code. http://phrack.org/issues/51/11.html https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1300864278497558528 31st August 2014:…
 
This week in Infosec (13:24) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 25th August 1991: Linux completes 30 years. It was on this date in 1991 that Linus Torvalds announced the first version. He actually wanted to call it as Freax, but his friend Ari Lemmke named it as Linux, which he accepted. Version 1.0 would later be re…
 
This week in Infosec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 14th August 2013: Affinity Health Plan was fined $1,215,780 for a HIPAA violation after a photocopier purchased by CBS for an investigatory report in 2010 revealed medical info. At $1.2M, photocopy breach proves costly https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1…
 
This Week in Infosec (14:29) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 10th August 2001: A Japanese woman, Kumiyo Kishi, was arrested for accessing her coworker's email account, then contacting the user's ISP to regain access after the coworker changed their password. Japan arrests woman for email snooping https://twitter.c…
 
This Week in InfoSec (07:40) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 30th July 2013: Chelsea Manning (their name was Bradley Manning at the time) was found guilty of espionage, theft, and computer fraud, as well as military infractions. United States v Manning https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1421171398656024587 …
 
This week in Infosec (06:42) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 27th July 1979: The first edition of Computer Security was published. It was written by David K. Hsiao, Douglas S. Kerr, and Stuart E. Madnick. And to think, some of you probably are surprised there were computers in 1979, never mind computer security! C…
 
This week in Infosec (08:10) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 16th July 2001: Russian programmer Dmitry Sklyarov was arrested the day after DEF CON for writing software to decrypt Adobe's e-book format. Charges against him were later dropped and the trial against his employer resulted in not guilty verdicts. United…
 
This week in Infosec (10.28) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 14th July 1998: Ethereal was first released publicly as version 0.2.0. Its creator, Gerald Combs, thought it was cool that Bob Metcalfe named Ethernet after luminiferous ether so he picked a name beginning with ether. Since 2006 the network protocol anal…
 
This weeks show is 33% off but the content is still as average as ever! This week in Infosec - 3 mins 11 secs Billy Big Balls - 12 mins 49 secs Rant of the week - 20 mins 52 secs Industry News - 30 mins 56 secs Tweet of the week - 38 mins 20 secs THIS WEEK IN INFOSEC With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 4th July 1994: …
 
This Week in InfoSec (08:03) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 30th June 1998: AOL confirmed a leaked spreadsheet containing info of 1,300 AOL community leaders had been stolen from an employee's account. Not around then? AOL was kind of a big deal - it bought Time Warner in 2000 and was worth $200 billion before im…
 
This week in Infosec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 19th June 1987: The first Summercon hacker conference was held in St. Louis, Missouri and was run by the hacker zine Phrack. It's still going strong - the 33rd edition took place virtually last year with in-person attendance returning to NYC next month. https://…
 
Artist - Carole Theriault This week in Infosec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account (and embellished by us 😉) 11th June 2008: Verizon released the first edition of its annual Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR). Incidents are still a thing. Data breaches are still a thing. Some stuff has changed. Some hasn't. Time…
 
This week in Infosec Liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account. 5th June 1991: Philip Zimmermann sent the first release of PGP to 2 friends, Allan Hoeltje and Kelly Goen, to upload to the Internet. Read his story about the release, including his disclosure of how little he understood about Usenet and what newsgroups even were. http://ww…
 
This week in Infosec Liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 1st June 1864: The first record of electronic spam was broadly revealed. A recipient was so infuriated by the dentist's poppycock that he composed a letter to the editor of The Times about the telegram, begging the newspaper to kindly demand a stop to the nonsense. https://t…
 
This Week in InfoSec 20th May 1993: Neil Woods (24) and Karl Strickland (22) became the first people imprisoned under the UK's 1990 Computer Misuse Act. Hackers given six months for 'intellectual joyriding': Judge says jail sentences inevitable to deter others 'similarly tempted' https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1395711166580731908 22nd Ma…
 
This Week in InfoSec Liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account: 15th May 1998: The first issue of Bruce Schneier's (@schneierblog) monthly Crypto-Gram internet newsletter was published. And The Secret Story of Non-Secret Encryption is a pretty pretty pretty pretty...good read. https://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram/archives/1998/0515.html…
 
This Week in InfoSec Liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 6th May 1995: Chris Lamprecht (aka "Minor Threat") became the first person banned from the Internet. He received a 70 month sentence for money laundering...and was banned from the Internet until 2003. https://www.wired.com/1997/12/twice-removed-locked-up-and-barred-from-net/…
 
This Week in InfoSec Liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 4th May 1990: Robert Tappan Morris was sentenced to 3 years probation, fined $10,000, and ordered to perform 400 hours of community service. Why? For releasing the Morris worm in 1988, then becoming the first person convicted under the then-new Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (…
 
https://cumrocketcrypto.com/ This week in Infosec takes us back to a time Microsoft devalued a company, before buying it and another case of something being referred to as electronic graffiti. Rant of the week is about this one time, at basecamp Industry News brings us the latest and greatest infosec news from around the globe Billy Big Balls talks…
 
Thom’s l33t crypto coin investments This week in Infosec Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account: 18th April 1995: proff (Julian Assange) published "The Dan Farmer Rap", about SATAN author, Dan Farmer. Yes, that Julian Assange. Yes, the same one. Yes. https://seclists.org/bugtraq/1995/Apr/195 19th April 2010: The OWASP Top 10 for 2010…
 
We think we sound much better this week, all thanks to Krisp! Tighten up your audio, remove background noise, and annoying work colleagues, all with Krisp. Download it here: https://ref.krisp.ai/u/ue2a67ba76 One advantage of being short is that you get to be in the front of all pictures taken of a group and that is all we have to say about Little P…
 
This week in Infosec (Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account): 4th April 1977: Ron Rivest first introduced Alice and Bob in the paper "A Method for Obtaining Digital Signatures and Public-Key Cryptosystems". https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1246652917605527554 http://web.mit.edu/jemorris/humor/alice-and-bob https://xkcd.com/…
 
April 1st! https://www.facebook.com/burgerking/posts/4438200159526619 https://twitter.com/VW/status/1376868756782219266 https://www.animationmagazine.net/tv/the-cats-out-of-the-bag-cn-rebrands-as-cat-toon-network/ This week in Infosec Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account: 27th March 1979: 33-year-old computer consultant Stanley Mar…
 
The Biggest Loser, Week 0 Andy is running a book if you are interested in a little flutter on who will be the healthiest in the next six months. Jav issues an apology to our listeners for misinformation and to Andy for correcting him when he stated the opposite had occurred: https://mashable.com/article/joe-biden-green-screen-conspiracy-debunked/?e…
 
Jav, Andy and Thom chat about the delights of the Nextdoor app. For our international listeners, just head to https://nextdoor.co.uk/ to find out about the uniquely Britishness of complaining about your neighbours on a public forum in a passive aggressive way without actually openly complaining about them. And it is all OK because it is on an App. …
 
Our regular know our regular features, so here is our regular update for our regular features for our regular listeners. This week in Infosec Tweet of the Week Billy Big Balls Rant of the week Industry News There is no Little People, there has never been a Little People Will we have a Sticky Pickle of the Week? This Week in InfoSec (Liberated from …
 
This week in Infosec (Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account): 6th March 1992: For the second year in a row the Michelangelo virus activated on this date. However, the lead up to March 6th, 1992 was the first instance of mass hysteria about a virus, though the hysteria was overblown. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelangelo_(comput…
 
This week in Infosec Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account: 2nd March 2002: Zone-H was launched in Estonia and began saving and publishing copies of defaced websites 7 days later. http://www.zone-h.org/news/id/4742?hz=2 https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1234492350833008640 2nd March 2010: Gregory D. Evans' book "How To Becom…
 
This week in Infosec Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account: 25th February 1989: Knight Lightning published an Enhanced 911 technical doc (it had been stolen from a BellSouth computer) to Phrack under the pseudonym "The Eavesdropper". http://phrack.org/issues/24/5.html#article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Riggs On T…
 
This week in Infosec Not liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account: 12th February 2009: 2009: Microsoft announced a $250,000 reward for info resulting in the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the Conficker worm. As of 2018, Microsoft's offer was still open. https://web.archive.org/web/20120418094401/http://www.microsoft.com…
 
10 minutes before rolling, our show notes were empty. This is what you get when you are dealing with professionals. This week in Infosec Tweet of the Week Billy Big Balls Rant of the week Industry News Sticky Pickle of the Week This week in Infosec (Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account): 11th February: 1956: 'Cambridge spies' surfa…
 
Nobody will look at Javvad in the eye again without seeing that image. It could be worse, you could have seen it live like Andy and Thom had to. This week in InfoSec (Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account): 3rd February 2007: A former Coca-Cola secretary to a executive was convicted after stealing documents and unlaunched product sa…
 
This week in Infosec 19th January 2012: US federal authorities shut down /Megaupload.com, a popular hub for illegal media downloads, and arrested its leaders. Hours later, the hacktivist collective Anonymous, knocked the US Department of Justice website offline. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seizure_of_Megaupload https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/…
 
This week in Infosec Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account: 19th January 1986: The first PC virus appeared. It was a boot sector virus called Brain, which spread via infected floppy disks to computers running MS-DOS. It was written by 2 brothers in Pakistan to protect their medical software from piracy. They later even licensed Brai…
 
The boys are back in town. Jav's return has also reduced the average age of this podcast by roughly twenty years. The good news though is that we not only have a full program, but also new jingles too! This week in Infosec Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account: 16th January 2007: Jeffrey Goodin became the first person convicted unde…
 
Welcome back to the New year and the new look Host Unknown, with a slightly less ethnically diverse lineup than usual, but, but still the same average quality and distinctly suspect ethics you have come to expect from Host Unknown. This week Thom displays his love of the Animaniacs, Andy has audio issues and Graham has the voice of a midnight hour …
 
This might be the last episode of the week, but that doesn't mean we scraped the barrel (except maybe for The Little People, but Jav has had a written warning for that already). Andy misunderstands the concept of "this week in infosec" and Thom tries to hold it together while juggling his newly acquired career in the security industry. Your usual t…
 
The penultimate episode of the year, so only one more to go until you have the full set for 2020. This week in Infosec (Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account): 3rd December 1980: The Australian Law Reform Commission chairman called for new laws to deal with "computer crime". He said the old definition of theft was not apt for a "fle…
 
Trigger warning, this episode is over an hour long; do not time anything with the length of this episode. This Week in InfoSec 21st November 2008: The Conficker worm was first discovered. It spread quickly by exploiting a vulnerability that was addressed via the patch described in Microsoft's out-of-band bulletin MS08-067 four weeks prior. It infec…
 
Join us for possibly the most incompetently performed and produced infosec podcast available today. At least we have some of your favourites to share and enjoy: This week in InfoSec (Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account): 14th November 1990: During an NBC News broadcast, two computer hackers from the hacker group MOD identified onl…
 
Haribo feature heavily this week, with Andy and Jav fighting over how much and how they should be delivered. This Week in InfoSec (Liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account): 5th November 1993: The Bugtraq mailing list was created by Scott Chasin. In 1995 it became the property of SecurityFocus, in 2002 Symantec acquired SecurityFocus, …
 
The fourth member of the Host Unknown trio, Carole Theriault, joins the podcast to bring an air of respectability to proceedings. Needless to say it was an uphill struggle. This weeks show brings you, dear listener: Smut or Security Do you know the difference between your smut and your security? This Week in InfoSec (Liberated from the “today in in…
 
Our presenters delve into their darkest secrets from the past, the internet is rebooted, the logs cleared, and cats play havoc with your home security (according to your training programme). This week in Infosec 24th October 2010: 2010: Eric Butler announced Firefox extension Firesheep's release at Toorcon, making HTTP session hijacking on open Wi-…
 
Perhaps a total IQ of 197 is a little ambitious, as this podcast clearly shows: This Week in InfoSec 20th October 1995: Mudge published "How to Write Buffer Overflows", one of the first papers about buffer overflow exploitation. Then @dotMudge sent a copy to @aleph_one, who wrote "Smashing the Stack For Fun and Profit" in 1996. Seminal paper to sem…
 
All your regular Host Unknown goodness, proof we really are part of your five a day. This Week in InfoSec 10th October 1990: The case of black hat hacker Kevin Poulsen aired on Unsolved Mysteries, 7 years after he went on the run. https://apnews.com/article/5998a45685b94e569c76c1908497d320 https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/13149887911537909…
 
Your regular features and even more, such as vegan sweets, Host Unknown imposters, Jav appears in the press with the same quote for different stories, and HMRC incompetence. Vegan sweets https://www.thejealouslife.com/products/tropical-wonder Will the real Host Unknown please stand up? This Week in Infosec 5th October 1991: The Linux kernel was rel…
 
It has been a quiet week, but Host Unknown still provides the goods. Admittedly the goods have come from Lidl. This Week in Infosec 25th September 2003: A report critical of Microsoft, "CyberInsecurity - The Cost of Monopoly", was published. As a result, Dan Geer, one of seven co-authors of the report, was fired by @stake. https://cryptome.org/cybe…
 
Andy's microphone is miraculously fixed, Thom's story is broken and Jav joins The Lemon Party. This Week in InfoSec 19th September 2011: Thai Duong and Juliano Rizzo demonstrated a proof of concept at the Ekoparty security conference to decrypt encrypted cookies, exploiting a vulnerability in TLS 1.0 and earlier. They named the attack BEAST (Browse…
 
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