Dr Steven R Cook สาธารณะ
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The main point of this pericope is that Moses called the second generation of Israelites to hear the statutes and ordinances that were part of the bilateral covenant agreement between them and Yahweh, their God. The Israelites were camped east of the Jordan River and poised to enter the land of Canaan. Moses “summoned all Israel and said to them: ‘…
 
In the first part of this pericope, Moses legislates three cities east of Jordan to be reserved as places of refuge, to which a manslayer could flee for safety (Deut 4:41-43). In the second part of this pericope (Deut 4:44-49), it is revealed that Moses is the one who gave Israel the law (תּוֹרָה torah), which law was given at the time when Israel …
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that Israel grieved over the depleted condition of Benjamin, but then acted with a human solution that harmed innocent persons. The eleven tribes of Israel had made a self-induced vow that none of their daughters should be given to the tribe of Benjamin (Judg. 21:1, 5, 7, 18); subsequently, the eleven tribes grieved …
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that eleven tribes of Israel go to war against the tribe of Benjamin in order to exact justice for the Levite’s concubine who was raped and murdered in Gibeah. The tribes of Israel—minus Benjamin—gathered to hear the Levite’s account of the rape and killing of his concubine (Judg. 20:1-7), and then decided to take ac…
 
In this pericope it is revealed that Yahweh is unique in all history, having been motivated by love, He chose to deliver His enslaved people from Egyptian bondage and bring them to the Promised Land, and Israel was to take it to heart and obey His commands so it would go well with them. The pericope is presented as a history lesson (Deut 4:32-34), …
 
In this pericope Moses warns Israel they will experience exile-punishment if they turn away from the Lord and pursue idols (Deut 4:25-28), but also restoration and blessing if they humble themselves afterward and return to the Lord in obedience (Deut 4:29-31). Moses knows it’s possible for God’s people to be seduced by the culture around them and t…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that a Levite—in order to save himself—sacrificed his concubine to worthless men who gang raped and killed her. A Levite left Ephraim to persuade his runaway concubine to return home (Judg. 19:1-3). His father-in-law was glad to see him and entertained him for three days (Judg. 19:4-7). The Levite eventually left and…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that a Levite—in order to save himself—sacrificed his concubine to worthless men who gang raped and killed her. A Levite left Ephraim to persuade his runaway concubine to return home (Judg. 19:1-3). His father-in-law was glad to see him and entertained him for three days (Judg. 19:4-7). The Levite eventually left and…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that the tribe of Dan desired land beyond what God had allotted to them, and by force stole Micah’s idols and priest, and violently attacked the people of Laish and renamed their city Dan. The tribe of Dan sent five spies to search for new territory (Judg. 18:1-2) beyond the choice land allotted to them (Josh. 19:40-…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that the tribe of Dan desired land beyond what God had allotted to them, and by force stole Micah’s idols and priest, and violently attacked the people of Laish and renamed their city Dan. The tribe of Dan sent five spies to search for new territory (Judg. 18:1-2) beyond the choice land allotted to them (Josh. 19:40-…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that an Israelite named Micah engaged in religious syncretism by blending the worship of Yahweh with the religious cultic practices of the Canaanites. Micah is introduced as a son who stole a great amount of wealth from his mother. He returned the wealth fearing the curse she’d uttered on the thief, and was subsequen…
 
Matthew 2:1-11 reveals the appearance of the Magi, godly Gentiles from the east, who came to worship Jesus as the newborn King of the Jews. This chapter opens with the report concerning Magi who arrived in Jerusalem from the east and were asking for directions to find “He who has been born King of the Jews” (Matt 2:1-2). Herod was not the rightful …
 
Manger images used in presentation Throughout the New Testament, at least five chapters mention the birth of Jesus,[1] whereas no less than sixty-six mention His death.[2] This shows the writers of New Testament Scripture, under the guidance of God the holy Spirit, placed an emphasis on Jesus’ crucifixion and death, which was an atoning sacrifice f…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that Samson fell into sin that ultimately led to divine discipline—defeat by the Philistines, gouging out of his eyes, public humiliation, and death—but God used Samson one last time to attack the Philistines, and so God’s will was accomplished through His servant. It’s not clear why Samson went to Gaza; but once the…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that God continued to work through Samson to cause disruption between the Philistines and Israelites. After the conflict with the Philistines during the wedding feast (Judg. 14:12-20), Samson returned to claim his wife, only to find her father had given her to another man (Judg. 15:1-2). Samson was so outraged that h…
 
The main point of this pericope is Moses’ warning to Israel to watch themselves carefully and stay committed to the Lord, lest, through idolatry, they forfeit God’s blessing and experience His judgment. Moses opens this section with a warning for Israel to be very careful to maintain their relationship with the Lord, reminding them, “you did not se…
 
The main point of this pericope is that Israel was to listen to God’s statutes and judgments, obey them, and teach them to their children and grandchildren so the covenant people could take possession of the land and live prosperous lives. This section marks a literary turning point from historical review to giving instruction for living, drawing f…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that God used Samson’s fleshly desires as an occasion to provoke the Philistines. Samson appears as one who desires to satisfy his flesh with women (Judg. 14:1-4; cf. 16:1, 4), food (vss. 14:8-9), games (vs. 14:12), and clothing (vs. 14:13). He sought to marry an unbelieving Philistine woman (Judg. 14:3), and this wa…
 
The Central Idea of the Text is that God revealed to Manoah and his wife that they would have a son who would help to begin the defeat the Philistines (Judg. 13:5). Manoah’s wife was barren and could not have children (like Sarah, Rebekah, Rachel, Hannah, and Elizabeth). God intervened to provide a son—Samson—that He would use to accomplish His wil…
 
In this pericope, Moses explains why he was not permitted to enter the land of Canaan (Deut 3:23-27), and how Joshua was selected by God as Israel’s new theocratic administrator (Deut 3:28-29). The military victories of Sihon and Og were objective measures of God’s working in and through His people as they advanced toward Canaan (Deut 2:16—3:22). M…
 
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