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Welcome to Tony Sam's Word of the Day Podcast! You may think you know what words mean, but YOU DON'T! Lucky for you, Tony Sam DOES. Tony Sam graduated magna cum laude from the Harvard School of Law and has been fascinated with the evolution of the English language as far back as he can remember. Currently serving as a Judge in the 23rd Circuit Court of Illinois, he finds time to learn more about words whenever he’s not walking his prized Labrador, Marshall. His other accolades include gradua ...
 
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Bumptious is an adjective that means self-assertive to annoying degree. It’s no coincidence that the first four letters in our word of the day come to the word ‘bump.’ Its origin is that it combines the word ‘bump’ with the word ‘fractious’ to means someone whose self-assertive personality can rub — or bump — people the wrong way. Here’s an example…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 27, 2022 is: jingoism • \JING-goh-iz-im\ • noun Jingoism is excessive patriotism or nationalism, especially when marked by a belligerent foreign policy. // When the war began many people were caught up in a wave of jingoism. See the entry > Examples: "War is bad for culture. Not least of all because it tur…
 
Check out Kira’s video library at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/russiansoundswithkira/ and if you’re NOT already a Patreon subscriber, sign up for 52 weeks of Russian phonemes with Kira at https://www.patreon.com/learnrussianwithkira/ – and someone go tell Reddit for me! Счастливо! 🌷☀️🦋🌱💫โดย Kimberly (Kira) DiMattia
 
Selenography is a noun that refers to the mapping of the moon. In Greek mythology Selene is the goddess of the moon. In recent years her name has been adopted for for words that refer to the moon. For selenography, the suffix G-R-A-P-H-Y has been added to created a word specifically related to geography of the moon. Here’s an example of selenograph…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 26, 2022 is: culminate • \KUL-muh-nayt\ • verb Culminate usually means “to reach the highest or a climactic or decisive point,” or "to reach the end or final result of something." // The festivities will culminate with a spectacular display of fireworks. // The partnership between the two songwriters culmi…
 
Banausic is an adjective that means serving utilitarian purposes only. Our word of the day comes from a Greek word banausikos (bah NO see kose) which means ‘of or for artisans.’ It must be remembered that artisans of the ancient world mostly created art for utilitarian purposes, things like vases and furniture. In time, banausic came to mean anythi…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 25, 2022 is: noisome • \NOY-sum\ • adjective The word noisome describes what is very unpleasant or disgusting, and is used especially of disgusting smells. // A noisome stench came from the narrow alley. See the entry > Examples: "In 1905, a 'garbage committee' led by a Mrs. J.G. McLean demanded a more sub…
 
Pyrite is a noun that refers to a ‘fools’ gold’ or something that appears valuable but is worthless. The Greek word pur (PU er) means fire. In addition to being the origin of such words as pyromania, it is also the basis of our word of the day. Pyrite usually refers to a shiny yellow mineral that was often mistaken for gold in the 19th century. But…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 24, 2022 is: confidant • \KAHN-fuh-dahnt\ • noun A confidant is someone to whom secrets are entrusted, and especially a very close friend. // She told only her closest confidant where she had buried the money. // The longtime confidant of the disgraced mayor was also brought in for questioning. See the ent…
 
Scattergram is a noun that refers to a diagram used to compare two variables. Coming from two common English words, scattergram is a synonym of a scatter diagram, that may be preferable because it rolls off the tongue faster and easier. Here’s an example of it in use: I used a scattergram to compare the different factors that has caused our team to…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 23, 2022 is: ingenuous • \in-JEN-yuh-wus\ • adjective Ingenuous is most commonly used to describe someone who shows innocent or childlike simplicity and candidness. // The ingenuous enthusiasm shown by several of the older campers was contagious, and soon everyone was excited about the project. See the ent…
 
Guttle is a verb that means to eat or drink greedily or noisily. The word gut is of Old English descent and refers to the bowels or digestive tract. When we Guttle we put stuff into our gut quickly and loudly. Here’s an example: It was fun to watch my family Guttle down the food I spent hours creating. But to honest, their loud and greedy eating li…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 22, 2022 is: quibble • \KWIB-ul\ • verb To quibble is to argue or complain about small, unimportant things. The word can also mean "to evade the point of an argument by making trivial or frivolous objections." // If I may quibble for a moment with your description of the uniforms: they are navy blue, not r…
 
Deliquesce is a verb that means to melt away or become liquid. The Latin word liquere (luh KWARE ay) refers to liquid. By adding the prefix D-E for ‘down,’ we get a word that means ‘to be’ or ‘to become’ liquid. After a winter that lasted way too long, it was great to see the ice deliquesce in a matter of hours. Watching ice melt has never been mor…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 21, 2022 is: prescience • \PRESH-ee-unss\ • noun Prescience is the ability to see or anticipate what will or might happen in the future. // Stacy had the prescience to know that the stock’s value wasn’t going to remain high forever, and she managed to sell it just before it started to decrease. See the ent…
 
Ultimo is an adjective that means of last month. Our word of the day comes directly from Latin, maintaining the same pronunciation and meaning. Here’s an example of ultimo in use: The first Monday ultimo was Connie’s birthday and I forgot it. I hope she doesn’t mind celebrating last month’s birthday this month.…
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 20, 2022 is: garrulous • \GAIR-uh-lus\ • adjective Garrulous can mean "chatty" or "excessively talkative" when describing a person (or even a bird that calls or sings rapidly and constantly), or it can mean "wordy" when referring to a piece of language itself, such as a letter or speech. // Annie’s garrulo…
 
Interlard is a verb that means to embellish with different material. Stemming from a Latin word, the prefix I-N-T-E-R means ‘between’ or ‘among.’ The word ‘lard,’ although generally used as a noun to refer to excess fat, can also be a verb that means ‘to embellish with.’ When we interlard something, we embellish it with lots of different material. …
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 19, 2022 is: emancipation • \ih-man-suh-PAY-shun\ • noun Emancipation is the act of freeing someone from the restraint, control, or power of another. It is especially used for the act of freeing someone from slavery. // Jomo Kenyatta played a key role in the emancipation of Kenya from European rule in the …
 
Stillicide is a noun that refers to a continual dripping. The Latin prefix S-T-I-L-L-A means ‘drop,’ while the Latin word cedere (say DARE ay) means ‘fall.’ The stillicide of raindrops onto my window put me to sleep very quickly. A continual drip against a hard surface does that to me every time.
 
Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for June 18, 2022 is: redolent • \RED-uh-lunt\ • adjective As a synonym of aromatic, the word redolent can describe something that has a noticeable smell without specifying the scent, but more often it is accompanied by of or with and means “full of a specified fragrance,” as in “redolent with smoke.” // No matter …
 
Remembrancer is a noun that refers to a souvenir. Coming from the root word memory, which is Latin in origin, remembrancer can be used to describe a souvenir or a person who reminds someone of something. My favorite remembrancer from my trip to Peru was a lovely knit cap. Every time I wear it, it reminds of all those wonderful times.…
 
Adduce is a verb that means to cite as evidence. The Latin word adducere (ah doo SER ay) means to lead towards. When we lead someone toward a conclusion, we adduce them — with evidence. Example: My wife adduced a number of incidents of cookie thievery to help me realize our cat Tabitha was nibbling on food in the night. By citing these example, she…
 
Ochlophobia is a noun that refers to an extreme fear or dislike of crowds or mobs. The prefix O-C-H-L-O is Greek in origin and it means crowds. P-H-O-B-I-A — also Greek — means fear. Here’s an example of our word of the day in use: With my ochlophobia, it was concerned that the crowds for our band would make me uncomfortable. But it turned out the …
 
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