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Vox Populi Radio is a political talk show hosted by Sean Astin. "America has entered a period of uncertainty. The truth is undervalued and anger drives public discourse. Every citizen must choose, engage or tune out. This show means to dig into the issues, respectful but unflinching and with a strong point of view. The foundation of civil discourse is listening. The key to winning with honor is decency and courage." - Sean Astin On Twitter: @seanastin -- #RaiseYourVox Facebook.com/SeanAstinP ...
 
Mike Mendoza @modernknightly takes you on an insanely fun retro ride to discover brand new nostalgia inspired Synthwave & Outrun music; weaving in and out of 80s & 90s Film/TV/Game/Music/Comedy Jams along the way. Educational, interactive, hilarious & silly; It's Bright. It's fun. It's Retro. Listen to Retro Party on Soundcloud, Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you listen to Podcasts 80s and 90s Music Television for the 21st Century Beaming Live Across The Galaxy Follow twitch.tv/retropr ...
 
SEASON TWO COMING 2021! A present day journalist uncovers the audio tapes of a 1950s private eye who cracked the greatest unsolved murder mystery Hollywood has ever known... and didn’t tell a soul. Starring Joe Manganiello, Alfred Molina, Constance Zimmer, Alan Tudyk, Camilla Luddington, Mike Colter, Misha Collins, Khary Payton, Nolan North, and Oliver Vaquer. "Angel Eyes" performed by Desi Dennis-Dylan. Directed by E. Ryan Martz. Written by Oliver Vaquer. Story by E. Ryan Martz and Oliver V ...
 
The huge Amazon Alexa hit Word of the Day is now available as a podcast! Word of the Day teaches you a useful word, its definition, etymology, and gives you examples of how to use it in a sentence. A new word each and every day! Perfect for those looking to expand their vocabulary, learning English and looking for a boost and anyone who loves words.
 
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Vox populi is a noun that refers to the popular opinion. Our word of the day comes from Latin and its literal translation is ‘the people’s voice.’ It can be used in a political setting or in an everyday manner such as: After our band’s first performance, everybody hated us. So we made this our last performance. As artists, we’ve always believed in …
 
Artblog Radio host Logan Cryer, sits down with Danny Orendorff, Executive Director of Vox Populi since May of 2018. This podcast gives the under-known inside scoop on Danny's career prior to Vox, the values he brings to the collective, and the slow but important changes that have been occurring within Vox since his appointment as Executive Director…
 
In this 25 minute conversation, Roberta speaks with Keyonna Butler, Costume Designer and Founder of Black Hippie Art, an organization designed to amplify, connect, and create opportunities for BIPOC artists.โดย Roberta
 
Votive is an adjective that means done to fulfill a vow or promise. It can also be used as a noun that refers to a short candle used in a religious ceremony. Our word of the day comes from the Latin word votum (VOE tomb) which means ‘vow.’ It is often used in a religious context. For example: After he’d been shunned by the community, Gary made a vo…
 
Plaudit is a noun that refers to praise or approval. Our word of the day comes directly from a Latin word meaning ‘applause’ or ‘claps.’ In recent years, the word is more likely to be used metaphorically and not in a reference to actual clapping. For example: I didn’t expect to get non-stop plaudits from the critics for my novel, but I’m happy I di…
 
Singularity is a noun that refers to a hypothesized era when machines merge with humanity. Coming from the Latin singulus (SEEN goo loose) our word of the day is often used simply to mean ‘a separate unit,’ but in the world of science and science fiction, it has a different meaning. It refers to the idea that humanity and machines will merge and be…
 
Natalie Sandstrom interviews Katie Samson, Director of Education at Art-Reach, in part 1 of a new three-part Artblog Radio series on the topic of Cultural Accessibility.โดย Natalie Sandstrom
 
Ennoble is a verb that means to elevate. The Latin word nobilis (NO bee lease) means ‘high born.’ This gave birth to the English word ‘noble.’ When we ennoble someone or something, we make them or it ‘noble’ in some sense, meaning we elevate it to a higher status. For example: That was the most brilliant novel I’ve ever read. Making it required rea…
 
Discomfiture is a noun that refers to awkwardness or unease. Coming from Old French, our word of the day is often used as a synonym of words like ‘distress,’ or ‘embarrassment.’ An example is: The sense of discomfiture my dad felt while visiting school was palpable. But looking back, I understand his unease. I would have felt just as uncomfortable …
 
Slugabed is a noun that refers to a lazy person who stays in bed late. The word slug is often used to describe lazy or unmotivated people. Our word of the day combines this word with ‘bed’ to get to a word more specific in its use: For example: James was such a slugabed that he often said his ideal job was one where he could wake up at noon, then g…
 
Ductile is an adjective that means flexible. The Latin word ducere (DOO chair ay) means ‘lead’ — as in the metal. Our word of the day is often used by metalworkers to describe a substance that can be reformed. But ductile can also be also be used metaphorically to describe things other than metal. For example: At first I didn’t realize how ductile …
 
Sojourn is a noun that refers to a temporary stay. It is also a verb that means to temporarily stay somewhere. Our word of the day once referred to being under a particular rule for a day. It combines the Latin prefix S-U-B (meaning ‘under’) with the Latin word diurnum (dee YOOR noom) meaning ‘day.’ Over time the meaning has shifted slightly to mea…
 
Whinge is a verb that means to whine or complain. It can also be used as a noun that refers to the act of complaining. Coming from Old English, our word of the day is a synonym of words like ‘whine,’ ‘grumble’ or ‘gripe.’ Here’s an example of it in use: My job at the rattlesnake farm can be laborious and at time, dangerous, but I won’t whinge about…
 
Denude is a verb that means to strip of possessions. The Latin word nudus (NEW doos) means ‘naked’ or ‘nude.’ To denude something or someone is to strip them — but not necessarily of clothes. The word is frequently used to describe the process of stripping someone of property or possessions. For example: When I went bankrupt, I lost everything. It’…
 
Curative is an adjective that means able to remedy a condition and a noun that refers to something that remedies a condition. The Latin word curare (coo RAHR ay) means ‘care’ or ‘cure.’ The word has evolved into English to mean ‘relating to cures.’ Our word of the day is generally used to described things used to cure ailments. For example: I enjoy…
 
Efface is a verb that means erase from a surface. Our word of the day comes from Latin and took a slight detour through French with the word effacer (EF ah say). It came be used literally or metaphorically. An example of its metaphorical use is: I hope my good deeds done at the shelter can efface the mistakes I made. I really regret those years of …
 
Abase is a verb that means humiliate or lower in condition. The Latin word bassus (BOSS oos) means ‘short of stature.’ When we abase someone, we make them feel small or lesser. I probably shouldn’t have scolded the employees for coming in late. I just wanted to underscore the need to arrive on time, not to humiliate them.…
 
Luminary is a noun that refers to a person who inspires others. Our word of the day comes from the Latin word lumen (LOO men) which means ‘light.’ Luminary was once a word to describe a natural light-giving body, especially the sun or moon. These days when we refer to someone as a luminary, the light they give off is metaphorical and refers simply …
 
Behoove is a verb that means to make necessary or proper because of a duty. Coming from Old English our word of the day is often used in a formal context. For example: Because of the immense responsibility involved with raising a child, it behooves a parent to step in when the child begins to develop unhealthy eating habits. This duty comes with ev…
 
Mythos is a group of beliefs prevalent to a group or culture. Our word of the day comes directly from Greek and refers to the unique cultural identity of a particular group of people. As a kid I was always fascinated with the mythos of the Mayan people, especially those surrounding the pyramids. Their beliefs and cultural background held a special …
 
Liminal is an adjective that means related to the initial stage of a process. The Latin word limen (LEE men) means ‘threshold.’ Our word of the day is used to describe things at their threshold, when a transition is taking place. For example: we had reached that liminal stage in our business when we were just connecting with our consumer base. But …
 
Isomorphic is an adjective that means having a similar form. The Greek prefix I-S-O means ‘equal’ or ‘identical,’ while morphe (MORE fey) is Greek for shape. The two chemicals were isomorphic and yet, despite their similarities, they had very different effects on the body.
 
Epistolary is an adjective that means related to a letter. The Latin word epistola (ay pee STOLE uh) means a letter. This word gave birth to its English equivalent epistle, meaning ‘letter.’ Our word of the day is the adjective version of this word, indicating something related to an epistle or a letter. My favorite novels are told in epistolary fo…
 
Monomania is a noun that refers to an obsession with one particular thing. We have the Greeks to thank for our word of the day. The prefix M-O-N-O means ‘single’ or ‘alone.’ And the Greek word mania refers to an excessive enthusiasm or obsession. Together they get monomania, an enthusiastic preoccupation with one particular thing. Andrew’s fascinat…
 
Reviewing some recent Zoom talks, several of them excellent, Morgan and Roberta also comment on the new David Wojnarowicz documentary film and the podcast story of a food critic who loses her sense of smell!โดย Morgan Nitz and Roberta
 
Metastasize is a verb that means to dramatically spread. The Greek word methistanai (methy STAHN ay) means ‘to change.’ This word later evolved into metastasis, a word for a disease, which later became our word of the day. Metastasize usually refers to a growth of something malignant in the body, but it can also be used metaphorically. For example:…
 
Repine is a verb that means to complain or express regret. The exact origin of our word of the day is unclear, but we can say with certainty that its prefix R-E refers to the past. When we repine something we regret past actions or behavior. For example: After a while, it gets a little tedious hearing Charlie repine at his past mistakes. We tried t…
 
Wrest is a verb that means to pull something away. It can also be used as a noun that refers to the act of pulling something away. Originating in Old English, our word of the day means to take something away forcefully and sometimes with great effort. For example: Roscoe, our Boston Terrier really like to nibble on our remote control. We often have…
 
Discover the brightest and most fun new 80s/90s inspired Synthwave on Retro Party with host Mike Mendoza (Modern Knight)Streamed Live 3.30.21 on Retro Promenade Twitch https://twitch.tv/retropromenade​​Live on Tuesdays!0:00 00 Intro / Motoroto - CMI Miami4:08 01 Gavriel - Thangs7:51 02 Matt Kwid - Slow Burn (feat. Pengus)13:16 03 Herb Alpert - Rise…
 
Trilemma is a noun that refers to a difficult choice between three options. Our word of the day is a variation of the word dilemma, which refers to a difficult choice made between two options. Just as dilemma begins with the prefix D-I for two, trilemma begins with T-R-I for three, indicating the number of choices a person has now is three. For exa…
 
Careworn is an adjective that means exhausted from stress. Our word of the day combines the common English words ‘care’ and ‘worn’ to describe someone who is worn down from prolonged worry. All those unpaid bills left Debra in bad shape. She looked careworn the other day at work.
 
Demulcent is an adjective that means soothing or relieving irritation. It can also be used as a noun that refers to something that soothes. The Latin prefix D-E means away, while mulcere (mool CHAIR ay) means ‘to soothe.’ This is the origin of our word of the day. When used as a noun it refers to something that soothes pain or irritation away. As a…
 
This week, we jam along to rad new music and talk Justice League & Synthwave Marketing with Joe Ozone of the Ozone Nightmare Podcasthttps://www.ozoneartfoundry.com/Discover the brightest and most fun new 80s/90s inspired Synthwave on Retro Party with host Mike Mendoza (Modern Knight)Streamed Live 3.23.21 on Retro Promenade Twitch https://twitch.tv/…
 
Disquisition is a noun that refers to an elaborate discussion of a particular subject. Our word of the day originates from the Latin word quaerere (kwa WOAR ay) which means ‘seek’ or ‘ask.’ This word evolved into disquisition and referred to an investigation. But more recently the word has come to refer to a lengthy and elaborate discussion — the k…
 
Stridor is a noun that refers to a harsh, grating sound. The Latin word stridere (STREE dare ay) means ‘to creak.’ Around the mid 17th century, this word was imported into English and became our word of the day, which is a synonym of creak or other harsh sounds. The stridor coming from my car’s engine irked me on the road trip. Imagine a harsh crea…
 
Attestation is a noun that refers to evidence or confirmation. The Latin word testis (TESS dis) means ‘witness.’ It’s related to words like ‘testify’ and ‘attest.’ These are verbs that can describe things a person does to give evidence of the truth. Our word of the day is a noun that simply refers to the evidence of the truth. For example: It was d…
 
Opine is a verb that means to hold and or state as an opinion. The Latin word opinari (oh pee NAR ee) means ‘think or believe.’ This word gave birth to our word of the day, which is closely related to the word ‘opinion.’ When a person opines, they are formulating or expressing what they think or believe. For example: I wasn’t expecting our economic…
 
Epochal is an adjective that means highly momentous or important. Our word of the day has its origin in the Greek word epoche (EP oke) which means ‘a fixed point in time.’ When something is described as an epoch, we mean it is an important point in time. Epochal is the adjective version of that. For example: There was something epochal about that l…
 
Middling is an adjective that means of medium or average quality or size. Appropriately enough, our word of the day comes from Middle English. Its prefix M-I-D means ‘middle.’ A person of middling appearance would be an average looking person and so on. I would describe our lemonade stand as a middling success. We didn’t come close to reaching fort…
 
Bon mot is a noun that refers to a clever word or phrase. Coming from French, the literal translation of our word of the day is ‘good word.’ But it is more clearly understood as a clever or witty word or series of words. For example: Annabelle was never been at a loss for words. She could find a bon mot to deliver to a judge as he sends her away to…
 
Sociolect is a noun that refers to a dialect of a particular class. Our word of the day is a fairly recent addition to English, originating in the 1970s. The prefix S-O-C-I-O means ‘related to society,’ while the suffix L-E-C-T refers to a dialect. When combined we get a word for a way of speaking unique to a social class. The guys I worked with on…
 
Dollop is a noun that refers to a massive blob of something. Our word of the day’s origin is uncertain, but we know it can mean a wide range of things from a giant lump of ice cream to a huge mound of dirt. Although mostly a noun, it can also be used as a verb, which means to add or serve a giant blob of something. For example: I have no idea what …
 
Demiurge is a noun that refers to an autonomous creative force. Our word of the day combines Greek word demos (DAY mos) which means ‘people,’ and ergos (AIR gos) which means “working.’ It was originally used to describe a god-like figure, or creator of the universe. But it later came to refer to any powerful or creative force. Emma has been promote…
 
Glen is a noun that refers to a valley. Coming from Late Middle English, our word of the day is a good when to recall when you’re on a hike and you find a narrow, secluded pathway between two hills. The view from the mountain’s peak was spectacular, but it was also breathtaking to hike through the glen and gaze up at the magnificent peaks from belo…
 
This week, we have an in depth state of the Synthwave industry chat with the indomitable Ashley Anita of Forged In NeonPlus! We jam along to rad new music by Frank Redux, Vincenzo Salvia, ZAYAZ, Vector Hold, Blaue Blume/Emil Rottmayer, Modern Knight, & BeckettDiscover the brightest and most fun new 80s/90s inspired Synthwave on Retro Party with hos…
 
Wont can be a noun, adjective or verb, depending on context. As a noun it refers to someone's habitual way. Our word of the day is spelled like won’t without the apostrophe and is pronounced like W-A-N-T, but its meaning and origin is different from both of those words. Coming from Old English, wont — W-O-N-T — means a person’s customary behavior i…
 
Ergonomics is a noun that refers to the science of design. The Greek word ergon (AIR gon) means ‘work.’ Our word of the day combines this word with ‘nomics,’ which refers to ‘the art of managing a household.’ This gets us to ergonomics which can be thought of a science, but, in everyday use, can simply refer to the placement of our desk or living r…
 
Millstone is a noun that refers to a heavy burden. Traditionally, a millstone is a heavy stone used to crush something. This is the origin of our word of the day, but in more recent use, millstone is generally applied metaphorically. For example: Kari used to think of that piano in her living room as a millstone, something that would be a real pain…
 
Bedraggled is an adjective that means dirty and disheveled. The root word of bedraggled is drag, which has an origin from Middle English. When we say someone is or looks bedraggled, we mean they seem as though they’ve been dragged around and roughed up. For example: It was embarrassing to see my kids show up at their graduation right after baseball…
 
Shibboleth is a noun that refers to a use of language unique to a particular group. Our word of the day comes from Hebrew. It means ‘ear of corn,’ but more importantly the word came to be used as a password to determine if someone was from the proper tribe. In more recent years, it simply refers to a word that is unique to a particular group of peo…
 
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