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In “The Future of Everything,” host and Stanford bioengineering professor Russ Altman explores how technology, science and medicine are shaping our lives. From stretchable electronics to ecological surveillance, foldable microscopes and video editing with artificial intelligence, Altman asks his guests to discuss their role in creating the future — of everything. Read more on the Stanford Engineering website: https://engineering.stanford.edu/magazine/future-everything
 
What's good? I'm Kwat Medetgul-Ernar. I’m an MD-PhD student at Stanford University. I tell you about the fundamental concepts and the latest discoveries in medicine and informatics. Keeping up with the latest science is expensive, feels like work, and is boring. At Stanford, I get to (and have to) study new things continuously. So, I decided to simplify what I get to learn and share it with you in a chill way, using everyday language. I want to teach you things without making you feel like s ...
 
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show series
 
Oft-heralded 3-dimensional printers can build objects ranging from simple spoons to advanced running shoes. While those objects are usually made very slowly, the latest printing technologies portend a new era of 3D printing in real-time for use in health care. The possibilities are endless, says Joseph DeSimone, who is an expert in translational me…
 
Tina Hernandez-Boussard is an expert in biomedical informatics who says a new era of understanding the real outcomes of our health care systems is on the horizon thanks to big data, artificial intelligence, and the growing availability of electronic health data. She says that the combination of these tools and data holds the promise of providing ne…
 
Nate Persily is a professor at Stanford Law School and an expert in election law. He sees the most recent presidential election as a fundamental change in the way Americans vote. For the first time ever, the majority of voters cast their ballot by mail, rather than at a polling place. It “was an earthquake,” Persily says, speaking metaphorically ab…
 
Whether by injury or disease, paralysis has afflicted humans through the ages. Only now have science and technology converged to a point where scientists can contemplate a day when computers and the human mind can communicate directly to restore a certain degree of independence to people with debilitating spinal injuries and other physical conditio…
 
Today we’re exploring the world of childhood, a “protected space in which they [children] can produce new ways of thinking and acting that, for better or worse, are entirely unlike any that we would have anticipated beforehand.” A protected space that exceeds, in length, that of any other species. A space of time that today’s guest has spent her ca…
 
Sam Wineburg, a research psychologist at Stanford’s Graduate School of Education, recently conducted a nationwide study of the fact-checking skills of thousands of American high school students. He didn’t go about it with a survey asking the kids to self-report their own behaviors. Instead, he devised a live experiment that charged the 3,000 studen…
 
Many have now become familiar with the term herd immunity, an idea few outside the infectious disease community knew just a few short months ago. It’s an elusive concept to comprehend, and harder still to achieve, but Stanford epidemiologist Dr. Julie Parsonnet says it’s important to understand just what herd immunity does – and doesn’t – mean for …
 
Imagine typing words into a text editor and watching on a nearby television as a well-known celebrity speaks those words within seconds. Computer graphics expert Maneesh Agrawala has imagined it and has created a video editing software that can do it, too. Given enough raw video, Agrawala’s application can produce polished, photorealistic video of …
 
Biology is not typically considered a mathematically intensive science, says Noah Rosenberg, an expert in genetics, but all that is about to change. Math, statistics, data and computer science have coalesced into a growing interest in applying quantitative skills to this traditionally qualitative field. The result will be better and more accurate m…
 
Today we are delighted to have Roy Richard Grinker with us. He a professor of anthropology and international affairs at George Washington University, and author of “Nobody’s Normal. How Culture Created the Stigma of Mental Illness.” Richard comes from a long line of research psychologists. His grandfather, Roy Richard Grinker, Sr. was a pioneer in …
 
Slowly but surely, the highly centralized, industrial electric grid that supplies power to the vast majority of American homes and business is changing. Our existing system of massive power plants and huge networks of high-voltage wires is giving way to a much leaner, decentralized system of small-scale power generation on a more personal, neighbor…
 
The world’s once linear — take it, treat it, use it, dispose it — model of freshwater usage is changing fast. Despite two-thirds of Earth being covered in water, just 2.5% of it is fit for human consumption. And that share is dwindling by the day, says civil and environmental engineer and expert in water treatment and distribution systems Meagan Ma…
 
Humankind has long harnessed the wind to its advantage. From ancient mariners to millers grinding grist, the wind has been an ally for millennia, but only now do engineers have at their disposal advanced computer simulations to better understand the details of wind flow and to optimize designs. Catherine Gorle is one such engineer who has made it h…
 
As the world moves to more efficient and cleaner energy solutions, there is a growing divide between the clean-energy haves and have-nots, says Anthony Kinslow II, PhD, a lecturer in civil and environmental engineering. Too often the divide falls along racial and socio-economic lines, as minority and low-income communities do not benefit from clean…
 
Electrical engineer Kunle Olukotun has built a career out of building computer chips for the world. These days his attention is focused on new-age chips that will broaden the reach of artificial intelligence to new uses and new audiences—making AI more democratic. The future will be dominated by AI, he says, and one key to that change rests in the …
 
Today we are delighted to have Dr. Marta Induni with us on the show. She is a principal investigator with the Public Health Institute. She is also director of Tracing Health, a program launched in response to the COVID-19 pandemic that provides contact tracing and scientific support services to counties and local health departments on the US West C…
 
Julie Owono is a lawyer, executive director of Internet Sans Frontières and a fellow at the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society. She wants the world to know that the internet is the not the same for every person, everywhere. Born in Cameroon, and having grown up in Russia, she understands firsthand that every nation sets and maintains…
 
Words are a window into human psychology, society, and culture, says Stanford linguist and computer scientist Dan Jurafsky. The words we choose reveal what we think, how we feel and even what our biases are. And, more and more, computers are being trained to comprehend those words, a fact easily apparent in voice-recognition apps like Siri, Alexa a…
 
When Riitta Katila looks at old photos or movies about the space program of the 1960s, she sees one common thread among the people depicted there — homogeneity. The engineers and technicians who first put humans on the moon were, almost without exception, white and male. While society has come a long way in the decades since, Katila, who is an expe…
 
Today we are thrilled to embark on a new adventure here on PeerSpectrum. The first episode of our new guest host series. We’re inviting back some of our most popular past guests and handing over the microphone. As Keith and I have learned over the past few years, there is an art and craft to interviewing. Playing on the field has given us both a de…
 
As the silicon chip embarks upon its second half-century of dominance in computing and communications, the field is confronting fundamental boundaries that threaten to halt that progress in its tracks. The transistor cannot get much better or smaller and the copper wires that connect them cannot carry much more data than they do now. But, says elec…
 
In recent decades, medical and biological science have advanced by leaps and bounds using technologies that allow us to peer into the brain in myriad new and insightful ways — MRI, CT, PET, EEG, etc. However, Stanford electrical engineer Jin Hyung Lee says, we are still missing critical insights that could lead to a cure for currently incurable bra…
 
Stanford’s Mark Schnitzer says several of the more exciting recent advances in his field of applied physics have come through developing new imaging technologies that peer into the brain as never before. What’s more, Schnitzer says the insights gained have put the world closer to solving long-vexing brain diseases, like Parkinson’s and others, wher…
 
The old maxim holds that a lie spreads much faster than a truth, but it has taken the global reach and lightning speed of social media to lay it bare before the world. One problem of the age of misinformation, says sociologist and former journalist Mutale Nkonde, a fellow at the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS), is that the …
 
Stanford’s Karen Liu is a computer scientist who works in robotics. She hopes that someday machines might take on caregiving roles, like helping medical patients get dressed and undressed each day. That quest has provided her a special insight into just what a monumental challenge such seemingly simple tasks are. After all, she points out, it takes…
 
It has been said that batteries hold the key to a sustainable future. But so-called “clean energy” does not come without environmental costs. For instance, says Stanford geoscientist Jef Caers, the batteries in a single Tesla contain some 4.5 kilograms — about 10 pounds — of cobalt, in addition to plenty of lithium and nickel, too. With some 300 mi…
 
Alexis Doyle is an MD student at the Stanford School of Medicine. Before starting medical school, she worked at the Mississippi State Department of Health on a maternal health project and completed graduate studies in Medical Anthropology and Public Policy as a Rhodes Scholar. Alexis attended the University of Notre Dame as an undergraduate, where …
 
Benjamin Gibbs is a MD-PhD student at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. He is currently working on his PhD in Pathology focusing on drug development for ovarian cancers. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a BS in chemistry and a minor in physics. Benjamin has been researching cancer since 2012. He is passionate ab…
 
Evan Reed and a team of scientists recently identified a promising solid material that could replace highly flammable liquid electrolytes in lithium-ion batteries. The trick? Reed didn’t discover the material the old-fashioned way, using trial and error to narrow down a list of candidates. Instead, he used computers to do the legwork for him. He sa…
 
Samantha Scharenberg is a second year MD-PhD student at Stanford University. She did her undergraduate at Stanford. There, she studied lysosomal storage diseases at the laboratory of Dr Matthew Porteus (the legend). We talked about science and her research: lysosomal storage diseases; the use of genome-editing technologies, specifically CRISPR/Cas9…
 
Think of someone accomplished, someone famous, someone you truly admire. Have you met them? If so, how did it go? What did you talk about? If not, what would you talk about? What questions would you ask them? For us, today’s guest is just that person. His name is Cal Fussman and he is a long time writer-at-large for Esquire Magazine through their “…
 
Santiago Enrique Sanchez is a Venezuelan second-year medical student and aspiring physician scientist at Stanford Medical School. He is an alumnus of the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied Plan II Honors and Biochemistry as a Health Science Scholar. He went on to do a Masters of Philosophy in Chemistry at Cambridge University under Pro…
 
Dr Justin Huang is an Institute Researcher in the Computational Biology group at MD Anderson Cancer Center's TRACTION Platform. His work focuses on bioinformatic infrastructure and computational analysis workflow development as well as computationally-aided discovery and translation of novel cancer targets. Dr Huang received his PhD in Bioinformati…
 
Renée DiResta is research manager at the Stanford Internet Observatory, a multi-disciplinary center that focuses on abuses of information technology, particularly social media. She’s an expert in the role technology platforms and their “curatorial” algorithms play in the rise and spread of misinformation and disinformation. Fresh off an intense per…
 
We will go over a paper titled: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: From Chronic Fatigue to More Specific Syndromes. I have read the paper, filtered out the noise, and kept the good points for you. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/appSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kwat/support…
 
Once the bathwater is drained, the toilet flushed or the laundry done, few give a passing thought to the wastewater that leaves our homes. But chemical engineer Will Tarpeh might change your mind, if you give him the chance. Tarpeh says that that water is a literal mine of valuable chemicals. Chemicals like nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium make g…
 
We will go over a paper titled: Analyzing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis immune response by T-cell receptor clustering with GLIPH2 and genome-wide antigen screening. I have read the paper, filtered out the noise, and kept the good points for you. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/appSupp…
 
Bioengineer Kwabena Boahen builds highly efficient “neuromorphic” supercomputers modeled on the human brain. He hopes they will drive the artificial intelligence future. He uses an analogy when describing the goal of his work: “It’s LA versus Manhattan.” Boahen means structurally. Today’s chips are two dimensional — flat and spread out, like LA. To…
 
We will go over a paper titled: Variation in the Human Immune System Is Largely Driven by Non-Heritable Influences. I have read the paper, filtered out the noise, and kept the good points for you. At the end, we will summarize the paper into few sentences. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.…
 
In a world where a drug takes years and billions of dollars to develop, just one in 20 candidates makes it to market. Daphne Koller is betting artificial intelligence can change that dynamic. Twenty years ago, when she first started using artificial intelligence to venture into medicine and biology, Koller was stymied by a lack of data. There wasn’…
 
We will go over a paper titled: Systems immunology: just getting started. I have read the paper, filtered out the noise, and kept the good points for you. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/appSupport this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kwat/support…
 
We will read a paper titled: A Prescription for Human Immunology. This is my first time reading this paper. Together, we read, summarize, and analyze few paragraphs at a time. Let's understand it. Let's identify its essence. Finally, in the end, let's try to capture the entire paper with only few sentences. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor…
 
On the release of this episode, we find ourselves in October of 2020. Still deep in the Covid-19 pandemic, and exactly one week away from the 2020 presidential election. Instead of piling on with our own opinions and speculation, we’re heading to the past for lessons and perspective that might, just might, help us make better sense of the world aro…
 
When Stanford bioengineer Markus Covert first decided to create a computer model able to simulate the behavior of a single cell, he was held back by more than an incomplete understanding of how a cell functions, but also by a lack of computer power. His early models would take more than 10 hours to churn through a single simulation and that was whe…
 
COVID-19 is changing how many scientists, like Stanford sleep expert Rafael Pelayo, MD, view their field. First off, the shift to telemedicine is providing Pelayo, author of the new book How to Sleep, an unprecedented glimpse into the sleep environments of his patients. “I’m making house calls for the first time,” he says. Second, surprisingly, som…
 
You’ve no doubt heard this famous quote from science fiction writer, William Gibson, “The future is already here – it's just not evenly distributed.” What better way to describe technology and medicine? The runway for technological innovation and adoption is just a little longer in our world. What other profession or industry can you think of that …
 
Marietje Schaake was a Member of the European Parliament from 2009 to 2019 and now serves as the international policy director at Stanford University’s Cyber Policy Center and international policy fellow at Stanford’s Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. As she has watched democracy evolve in the age of instantaneous global communi…
 
Andrew Huberman is a Stanford neurobiologist and ophthalmologist keenly interested in the biology of stress and ways to manage stress. He’s developed and tested a number of stress-relieving techniques — from specific patterns of breathing to visual tools — and uses virtual reality to help humans control their stress in adaptive ways. He is also tes…
 
Manu Prakash was in France when COVID-19 took hold throughout the world. There, the Stanford bioengineer, famous for “frugal science” like his $1 field microscope made of paper, witnessed the challenges a relatively well-resourced nation experienced holding back the disease. His head was soon filled with visions of the nightmare awaiting developing…
 
All right, welcome back. If you think you have a pretty good handle on the opioid crisis, the pharmaceutical industry and how it all works, today’s episode may challenge that assumption. It certainly did for us. The modern pharmaceutical and biotech industries are like no other. How they got to where they are is a story like no other. The same busi…
 
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