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A discussion about Tāngata Ngāi Tahu: People of Ngāi Tahu, Volume 2 tracing the history of the Otago region through the Ngāi Tahu people of Āraiteuru. The korero was facilitated by Waiariki Parata-Taiapa who lead co-editors Helen Brown and Dr Michael J. Stevens and contributing author and chair of Te Rūnanga o Ōtākou Edward Ellison as they talked a…
 
Cityscapes and their surroundings have an intimate connection to the literary imagination, inscribing a sense of place and identity that persists through time. Frank Gordon, Roger Hickin, David Ciccoricco, and Nicola Cummins will discuss the varied ways they have mapped our city’s stories.
 
HG Parry is an emerging author who writes complex and engaging fantasy novels.​She will explain to Lynn Freeman the imaginative thought processes that led her, in her most recent series, to reinvent the French Revolution.
 
Elizabeth Knox, acclaimed author of many novels, including The Vintner’s Luck and, most recently, The Absolute Book, will unpick the meanings and implications, the whys and wherefores, of placing a ‘fantasy’ world inside the ‘real’ world, with HG Parry. ​
 
Rose Carlyle, who shot to literary fame with her debut novel, The Girl in the Mirror, will talk to Phillippa Duffy about what happens to a story when a book is snapped up by Hollywood. ​
 
Chair Susan Sims and authors Nalini Singh, Steff Green, and Jayne Castel will unpick why romance writing matters in 2021, and discuss the ongoing appeal of romance novels and what success looks like to writers of this billion-dollar genre.
 
The current Poet Laureate, David Eggleton, will dive into his new book, The Wilder Years: Selected Poems, with fellow poet Victor Billot. This session will be followed by the official launch of the book.
 
“My neighbour gave me a stack of old calendars, and so, in the absence of any other paper, I’ll write to you on the backs of all the vanished years.” With her latest novel Remote Sympathy, award-winning bestseller Catherine Chidgey tells an engrossing and unsettling tale of a Nazi Germany labour camp from the perspectives of three wilfully obliviou…
 
Rebecca Kiddle and Amanda Thomas, contributing writers for Imagining Decolonisation, will discuss why decolonisation is beneficial to everyone, and who is, and who should be, doing the mahi. ​
 
From sprawling braided riverbeds to exhilarating surf breaks, Aotearoa is both an angler's paradise and a surfer's dream. Dougal Rillstone and Derek Morrison will sit down with fellow explorer Bruce Ansley to talk about their sense of self in remote and wild places.
 
One of the joys of reading is being transported into the wilds of both your own and someone else’s imagination. HG Parry and Gareth Ward will discuss crafting stories that take us into fantasy worlds far from the mundane, with Bronwyn Wylie-Gibb.
 
For centuries, poetry has played an important role in both recording cultural events and reflecting the mood of the people. David Eggleton, Jessica Thompson Carr, and Fiona Farrell will share perspectives on the politics inherent in poetry. Chaired by Emma Neale, they will examine the way poetry enables debate, and how it can subvert and challenge …
 
In Map for the Heart: Ida Valley Essays, Jillian Sullivan’s gentle essays about her wanderings and wonderings in the vast Ida Valley are an exploration of the physical place, and how it connects us to our community. She and Liz Breslin will discuss how place and space affect the heart.
 
Māori Scholars at the Research Interface. Co-editor of Ngā Kete Mātauranga: Māori Scholars at the Research Interface, Jacinta Ruru describes this beautiful and transformative book as “an opportunity to provide New Zealanders with an insight into how Mātauranga is positively influencing the Western-dominated disciplines of knowledge in the research …
 
Becky Manawatu's debut novel, Auē, garnered critical acclaim and announced her as a compelling new voice in New Zealand fiction, winning the Jann Medlicott Acorn Prize for Fiction and the Hubert Church Prize for Fiction at the 2020 Ockham New Zealand Book Awards. Kiran Dass described Auē as “a beautifully pitched and nuanced hopeful story about the…
 
​​What Do They Have to Tell Us About the Future? Vanda Symon, Steff Green, HG Parry, and Angela Wanhalla will talk about women who’ve come before and those who are here now, and the footprints they’ve laid for our future. Hosted by Majella Cullinane.
 
Rose Carlyle, Nalini Singh, and Kyle Mewburn will read an excerpt from a significant childhood story and talk about the shaping effect it has had on their adulthood. Hosted by Bridget Schaumann.
 
Lynn Freeman sits down with Vincent O’Sullivan to talk about his recent work, including his new collection of poems Things OK with you? and of course the biographical portrait, Ralph Hotere: The Dark is Light Enough.
 
“Step through the gateway now to stories that are as relevant today as they ever were,” invites master storyteller Witi Ihimaera. He will talk with Jacinta Ruru about his latest book, Navigating the Stars: Māori Creation Myths, in which he traces the history of Māori people through their creation myths, bringing them to the twenty-first century.…
 
Jared Savage and Steve Braunias will tackle some of the big questions about crime in Aotearoa and what they have learned in the process of writing about it. With Rob Kidd.
 
From paranormal romance to crime thrillers, The New York Times bestselling author Nalini Singh will talk to Kirby-Jane Hallum about how and why she has crossed genres, and her three most recent releases: Alpha Night, Archangel’s Sun, and Quiet in Her Bones.
 
As an island that relies heavily on tourism, the COVID-19 crisis has led to Bali’s most challenging period in recent memory. Our panelists have spent decades in Indonesia’s tourism industry and contributed greatly to its development. They’ll reflect on how the global halt in travel has impacted on the island’s future, and how lessons from the past …
 
Pelatih somatik dan instruktur bela diri, Made Janur Yasa, menemukan cara yang praktis dan efektif untuk mendorong warga mengelola sampahnya. Bagaimana? Dengan menukarnya dengan beras sumbangan. Seperti inilah terobosan pengelolaan sampah – di tingkat desa. Dengarkan Made Janur Yasa mengenai inisiatif menarik yang juga membantu kebutuhan masyarakat…
 
In Sea People, Christina Thompson explores the fascinating story of Polynesia’s ancient voyagers, as well as the sailors, linguists, archaeologists, folklorists, biologists, and geographers who have puzzled over this history for three hundred years. Listen in to experience a masterful mix of history, geography, anthropology, and the science of navi…
 
Man of Contradictions, the first English-language biography of Jokowi, argues that the president embodies the fundamental contradictions of modern Indonesia. He is caught between democracy and authoritarianism, openness and protectionism, Islam and pluralism. Join Ben Bland to find out why he believes Jokowi’s incredible story shows what is possibl…
 
Tyson Yunkaporta looks at global systems from an Indigenous perspective. His new book Sand Talk provides a template for living. It’s about how lines, symbols, and shapes can help us make sense of the world. It’s about how we learn, and how we remember. Join him to learn about Indigenous thinking, and how it can save the world. Featuring Tyson Yunka…
 
Edwidge Danticat’s latest book of short stories, Everything Inside, is set in Port-au-Prince, Miami, and beyond. It reflects on community, family, and love, and how people come to terms with death, of both their loved ones and their own. Edwidge will discuss her work, her life, Haiti, America, and immigrant stories. Featuring Edwidge Danticat and C…
 
Independent investigative journalist, Febriana Firdaus, is a regular contributor to The Guardian, covering topics from COVID-19 to the Black Lives Matter movement in West Papua. Her works have appeared in Time Magazine, Al Jazeera, Financial Times, among others. She writes about social injustice, Indigenous communities, and stories of women across …
 
“My stories come from a very unconscious place. I don’t premeditate them, I don’t know what’s going to happen in them.” There’s no one like Etgar Keret. His stories take place at the crossroads of the fantastical, searing, and hilarious. His characters grapple with parenthood and family, war and games, marijuana and cake, memory and love. Join Etga…
 
Join James Oseland to hear about his travels in search of the world’s best restaurants, street food stalls, and home cooks. James is the author and editor of World Food, a book series launching this November with World Food: Mexico City. He was a judge on all five seasons of Bravo’s Top Chef Masters and the editor-in-chief of Saveur. His cookbook C…
 
The Guardian called Intan Paramaditha’s debut novel The Wandering an “ingenious choose-your-own-adventure challenge, [which is] at least five books in one.” Originally published in Indonesian as Gentayangan and translated into English by Stephen J. Epstein, The Wandering has received multiple awards. Join Intan for a raw and insightful conversation…
 
Indonesia, 1998. With the fall of Suharto’s 32-year autocratic regime following years of political turmoil and violence, the ‘Reformation Era’ was ushered in. Heaped upon it were promises of freedom, prosperity, and a corruption-free society. Three thinkers weigh in on what has – and hasn’t – changed since. Featuring Putu Fajar Arcana, Saras Dewi, …
 
“Sink it” became a national catchphrase after Indonesia’s maverick (now former) Minister of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries fulfilled her threat to sink any foreign boats found illegally fishing in Indonesian waters. In 2017 she ordered the sinking of around 87 illegal boats. Ibu Susi reflected on her fight to protect the country’s millions of fishe…
 
Each year UWRF puts a call out to emerging writers across the archipelago: send us your stories. In 2019, we received 1,253 submissions, the highest number since the Emerging Writers program’s inception in 2008. The works of five talented wordsmiths were selected for publication in our annual Bilingual Anthology. Hear about their journeys to UWRF, …
 
Around 9 million Indonesians live and work overseas, along with countless descendants of Indonesian migrants. Our panel of orang Indonesia living in diaspora recounted their personal experiences of what it means to be Indonesian elsewhere. Featuring Ketut Yuliarsa, Cynthia Dewi Oka, Michelle Tanmizi, Innosanto Nagara, and Laksmi Pamuntjak. You can …
 
Indonesian comic superheroes have long been in the stranglehold of foreign character translations. But the Marvel Cinematic Universe is creating demand for local superheroes, along with Gundala, a recent film based on the character created by Hasmi in 1969. Join our panel of graphic gurus and serial storytellers as they sketched reasons why now is …
 
The dust has far from settled on #MeToo, “a movement that represents probably the greatest and most conspicuous collaboration of women since the suffragettes”, according to Sam George-Allen. With the viral hashtag in regular rotation in more than 85 nations and aftershocks still rippling around the world, feminists from Indonesia, Australia, Pakist…
 
Poppy tears, opium, heroin, fentanyl: poppy latex is a commodity without rival. Acclaimed cultural historian Lucy Inglis took us on an epic journey from ancient Mesopotamia to modern America and Afghanistan with tales of addiction, trade, crime, sex, war, literature, medicine and, above all, money, as she charted the evolution of the milk of paradi…
 
Andreas Harsono has covered Indonesia for Human Rights Watch since 2008. His new book Race, Islam and Power: Ethnic and Religious Violence in Post-Suharto Indonesia is the result of his 15-year project to document how race and religion have become increasingly prevalent in the nation’s politics. Join him in conversation with long-term Indonesian me…
 
“We’re fractured nations because we’re not reading or translating each other,” said Malaysian author Bernice Chauly during the UWRF17 panel on the 50th anniversary of ASEAN. Join our group of experts as they compared their experiences of cultural diplomacy, and invited us to consider how the arts can break down barriers and connect people across la…
 
The domestic, the interior and the personal have traditionally been relegated to the realm of women’s writing, which in recent years has been dismissed as too small to attract significant readership, critical acclaim and writing awards. Our panelists looked beyond the censure and spoke out in praise of the domestic. Featuring Astrid Edwards, Fanny …
 
“In this day and age recipes are abundant… I love that I can learn a little bit more, whether it’s political, philosophical, historical, or personal.” For Yotam Ottolenghi, food is always a gateway to bigger conversations. This is a rare chance to hear from one of Britain’s most-loved food writers, in conversation with longtime food journalist and …
 
Born into a Shia Muslim family that migrated to the US after fleeing the Iranian Revolution, Reza Aslan converted to Christianity as a teen and then returned to Islam. He is now a religious scholar, bestselling author, broadcaster and commentator. He shares his insights into aspects of global faiths both human and divine. Featuring Reza Aslan and T…
 
The way we consume stories is rapidly changing, and the popularity of graphic novels, memoirs and other types of visual storytelling for adult audiences proves images can capture enthralling narratives. Join these skilled sketchers from around the world as they discussed the joys and challenges of transforming words into poignant pictures. Featurin…
 
Indonesia has 150 million internet users and 800,000 hoax-distributing websites, according to the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology. In a system swimming with fake news, what is the relationship between rising social media use and increasing religious conservatism? How is social media being manipulated for political gain? Join ou…
 
From gentle mockery to caustic sarcasm, there’s a victim at the butt of most good laughs. Must comedy be cruel to work, and does that mean comedians have a free pass when it comes to how they treat others? We’ve convened a round table of comedic writers and performers to dissect whether good comedy and good karma are mutually exclusive. Featuring M…
 
It’s been 26 years since Irvine Welsh gave the world Trainspotting, the book deemed by Rebel Inc. “the best book ever written by man or woman” that went on to define a generation. Since then he’s written 11 more books, plus plays and adaptations. Give Born Slippy. NUXX a spin, then listen in as he reflects on a life spent with razor-sharp words. Fe…
 
Award-winning hip-hop artist Akala’s bestselling Natives: Race and Class in the Ruins of Empire is a searing polemic on race and class in the British Empire. With a life and outlook shaped by these elements, Akala takes us from the personal to the universal as he confronts the issues at the heart of the legacy of Britain’s racialized empire. Featur…
 
Memoirs are no longer seen as the self-indulgent domain of those at the end of long and accomplished lives: millennials around the world are writing fresh and compelling stories, tackling everything from the legal system to life in the shadow of Tiananmen Square to mental health. Our panelists compare their experiences of putting their lives on the…
 
Crafting the perfect sentence in one’s mother tongue is hard enough, without the complications that working in a second language brings. But that hasn’t stopped this panel. Not content to create in just one language, they share accounts of their personal experiences of the joys and frustrations of becoming multilingual wordsmiths. Featuring Yirga G…
 
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