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The Global Thinkers Project, Oxford was launched in 2017 with the aim of reviving silenced voices in the discipline of International Relations (IR). It explores the internationalist thought of individuals who have made significant contributions in international affairs but have been excluded from the discipline due to biases of language, region, and gender. By encouraging IR to 'rethink its thinkers', our project responds to a call for a more inclusive, diverse, and ‘Global IR’, making Oxfor ...
 
These oral history interviews, conducted by Georgina Ferry, capture the stories of pioneering women at the forefront of research, teaching and service provision for computing in Oxford, 1950s-1990s. Themes throughout the interviews include career opportunities, gender splits in computing, the origins and development of computing teaching and research in Oxford, as well as development of the University of Oxford's Computing Service and the commercial software house the Numerical Algorithms Gr ...
 
The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography's SoundCloud channel introduces you to notable men and women who've shaped the British past, worldwide. The biographies cover all walks of British life - including literature, the arts, sport, politics, business, and science - and range from pre-history to the 21st century. The stories are selected from the 60,000 lives within the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. The Dictionary is the national record of people who've left their mark on Brit ...
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, host Professor Adam Smith talks to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
The Stubbs Society for Defence and Foreign Affairs, founded in 1884, is Oxford University's oldest society dedicated to the study and discussion of global politics and international relations. Join us in our new regular podcast series as we sit down with leading figures from international relations, diplomacy, intelligence, the armed forces and British and global politics.
 
The inaugural Oxford-India Day took place on 17 June 2011. The event aimed to celebrate the longstanding and varied links between the University and India, and to reinvigorate and strengthen those links. Over 80 external guests, representing Indian business, Indian government, UK government, Indian civil society, journalism, law and academia came to Oxford, exploring cutting-edge collaborative research; the students and staff who have come to Oxford from India; and the outstanding collection ...
 
Check in to Miami University's #1 radio show hosted by Evan Burnham and Joe Hayden and listen as the boys give you their hilarious take on life in the fantasy land of Oxford, Ohio. Updated with a new show every week! Check out the official Spotify playlist @Oxbox Radio.
 
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show series
 
Remember those days when it was possible to climb aboard a plane and jet off around the world? Well, while we might be yearning for foreign shores, there's no denying that air travel comes with a big ol' carbon footprint. But is it possible to make aeroplanes 'greener'? We chat to Dr Chiara Falsetti, a researcher at the Oxford Thermofluids Institut…
 
The moon may be the closest planetary body to us, but we still have a lot to learn about it. For example, what is the water-cycle like on an airless body such as the moon? How much water can be found there, and could we one day utilise this water for space exploration? In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast, we chat to Dr Katherine Shirley, a…
 
The latest edition of University Registrars Talking About Stuff sees me chatting to Lee Sanders, Registrar and Secretary at the University of Birmingham Lee talks about his all-encompassing role across professional services at Birmingham as well as in relation to governance and as a member of the university executive. Drawing on experiences from bo…
 
We're over a year into the coronavirus pandemic, and it's affected our lives in many ways - including, for many of us, how we sleep. You may have experienced changes to your sleep pattern (particularly if you waved goodbye to your commute last March), your quality of sleep, or even had some very weird or vivid dreams! If so, you're not alone. Join …
 
The latest edition of University Registrars Talking About Stuff offers the opportunity to hear from Douglas Blackstock, Chief Executive of the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. We learn all about the work of the QAA and how it has shrunk significantly in size in recent years but remains an organisation with global reach and one which i…
 
In this episode we speak to to three women journalists from Kyrgyzstan, India and Indonesia discuss female representation in the news media, why they got into journalism, and how to ensure women’s voices and interests are heard. In this episode of our Future of Journalism podcast we speak to to three women journalists from Kyrgyzstan, India and Ind…
 
If you've ever been lucky enough to hear a lion roar (whether that's at the zoo or in the wild - hopefully at a safe distance!), you'll know that it's a truly bone-shaking experience. But do lions have a unique roar, or do they all sound the same? How could knowing this help with conservation efforts? Join us for this episode of the Big Questions p…
 
Episode 25 (a bit of a landmark) features our first international guest on University Registrars Talking About Stuff. Esa Hämäläinen is Director of Administration at the University of Helsinki and also Chair of a notable European higher ed association, HUMANE, the Heads of University Management & Administration Network in Europe. We learn about Esa…
 
In this episode of our 'Future of Journalism' podcast, we look at the values that drive a thriving membership model at an Argentinean news site We talk to one of Latin America's most senior journalists Chani Guyot whose news website RED/ACCIÓN runs a successful membership model that goes beyond being a revenue stream. We look at how the news outlet…
 
In this episode of University Registrars Talking About Stuff it is my enormous pleasure to be talking to Sheena Stewart who is University Secretary at Abertay University in Dundee. Sheena has worked at Abertay for an extraordinary 30 year period but, given what we have been through lately, we mainly look back at the past 12 months and then into the…
 
In this year's Valentine's episode, we're exploring one of the most special relationships around. That's right - the one between us and our dogs! We often hear pooches described as "(wo)man's best friend", but for how long has this been the case? Join Prof Greger Larson, an expert in palaeogenomics and bio-archaeology, as we journey back thousands …
 
Throughout the Victorian period, Black abolitionists toured the British Isles. In an effort to enlist British support for ending slavery in America--and later to enlist support for black rights--African Americans spoke not just in London or Leeds but in small towns and villages from the north of Scotland to the foot of Snowdonia and beyond. In this…
 
After their own successful secession from the British Empire in the War of Independence, Americans cheered on other plucky nations attempting to wrest themselves from the yoke of others. Whether in Latin America, Hungary, Poland, Ireland or Italy, Americans mostly thought that national self-determination was a good thing. So naturally, when they cr…
 
It's a question that's on the lips of politicians, scientists and policy-makers right across the globe - who should get the COVID-19 vaccine first? Should it be the elderly and clinically vulnerable, healthcare professionals and other frontline workers, or another group entirely? We chat to Dr Alberto Giubilini, a philosopher at the Oxford Uehiro C…
 
In this episode Adam talks to Eric Foner, the pre-eminent historian of the Civil War and Reconstruction, about the resonances of the Reconstruction era in the present day. In the aftermath of the Civil War, the US had to deal with a recalcitrant white population in the South who rejected the legitimacy of the Federal government's attempt to give po…
 
Adam talks to Mitch Robertson and Kate Guy about Joe Biden's inaugural address and the prospects for his administration. Is this a “new page in America’s story” as Joe Biden says? Adam and guests discuss the new president's appeal to his understanding of the "American tradition" and whether it will work.…
 
When Trump supporters invaded the US Capitol on Jan 6, 2020, in an attempt to prevent the ratification of the election of Joe Biden, the immediate response of many in the American media was that it was "not who we are". But in this episode, Adam talks to Bruce Baker from the University of Newcastle and Grace Mallon from Oxford, who explain that in …
 
In this episode of our podcast we delve into our survey of 234 digital leaders in 43 countries to look at the major trends that will influence journalism in the year ahead. In this episode of our podcast we delve into our survey of 234 digital leaders in 43 countries to look at the major trends that will influence journalism in the year ahead. We l…
 
Is it possible to edit someone's genes before they are born to make them a nicer, kinder, more moral person? Not only that - but, importantly, should we do this? When it comes to gene editing for moral enhancement, there are many ethical points to consider. Join us as we chat to Tess Johnson, a Philosophy PhD student at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for…
 
Following the suspension or barring of Donald Trump by many of the largest social media and tech platforms, after his supporters stormed the Capitol building in January 2021, we explore the issues surrounding these decisions. Following the suspension or barring of Donald Trump by many of the largest social media and tech platforms, after his suppor…
 
Why did the framers of the American constitution invest the President with so many of the powers and trapping of a king? Why does he have the power to pardon felons (including his friends), to command the army and to veto legislation? More to the point why did the framers end up creating a Presidency that although elected nevertheless wields more p…
 
Most of us have probably heard of video games being described as "addictive", but is there evidence of this? Are they damaging to our mental health, or could they actually have a positive impact on our metal wellbeing? In this episode of the Big Questions podcast we're booting up our consoles, and asking Prof Andrew Przybylski, Director of Research…
 
In this final Future of Journalism podcast of the year, members of our senior leadership team reflect on this momentous year for journalism and what we can perhaps look forward to next year 2020 has been a year like no other. World-changing events including the COVID-19 pandemic, the movement for racial justice, a fractious U.S. presidential electi…
 
It's that time of year - the festive jumpers are going on, the lights are going up, and we're ready to decorate our Christmas trees. But when it comes to choosing your fir, what do you go for - real or fake? Perhaps you have a trusty old family-favourite that comes down from the attic each year? Or maybe going to choose a real tree gets you into th…
 
Journalists from some of Scandinavia's leading news publishers discuss their organisations' premium news strategies, the value of lifestyle news and the false dichotomy of hard/soft news, and the role of gender. Journalists from some of Scandinavia's leading news publishers discuss their organisations' premium news strategies, the value of lifestyl…
 
Two authors of the first report from our Trust in News Project discuss how partisanship, transparency and other factors may contribute to trust in news, and what outstanding questions need exploring. Two authors of the first report from our Trust in News Project discuss how partisanship, transparency and other factors may contribute to trust in new…
 
In a chat with Rasmus Nielsen, Alan Rusbridger, former Editor-in-Chief of the Guardian, argues journalists should be more transparent and rethink their relationship with their audience Our host is Rasmus Nielsen, Director of the Reuters Institute. Our guest is Alan Rusbridger, former Editor-in-Chief of The Guardian and Principal of Lady Margaret Ha…
 
Did you know that the winner of the 2019/2020 Fantasy Premier League, beating over 7 million other players, was Dr Joshua Bull - a researcher at Oxford's Mathematical Institute? How did he win? Turns out that 'mathematical thinking' and a strategic approach, combined with "gut instinct and a healthy dose of good luck" might just be the answer! Coul…
 
Author of a new report into the trends around news podcasts during the COVID-19 pandemic Nic Newman discusses his findings. How successful are these podcasts? What different formats exist? What do news outlets need to consider? Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is an…
 
In the latest edition of University Registrars Talking About Stuff, Episode 23 in the series, I’m in conversation with Andrew Young, Chief Operating Officer at the London School of Economics. We talk about Andrew’s career history - from Newcastle to the capital - and the joys and challenges of working in an institution with such a distinctive histo…
 
Episode 22 of University Registrars Talking About Stuff finds me in discussion with Gill Aitken, Registrar at the University of Oxford. Gill talks through her career from private sector legal firm to civil service lawyer in the Department of Health, also leading various professional teams, and now her first couple of years at Oxford where she has r…
 
Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin was an outsized media event. No one in America in the 1850s could avoid knowing something of its characters and themes. It brought into the homes and hearts of millions of Americans a dramatic and heartrending story about an enslaved family. White people who wanted to avoid thinking about the reality …
 
We've probably all heard the phrase 'Big Brother is watching you' (a reference to the fictional character in George Orwell's dystopian novel '1984') - but are we really under constant surveillance? Is it actually possible to be a fully functioning member of modern society without being tracked by some sort of surveillance system? And how is technol…
 
A week after election day in 2020, Joe Biden has won the election with a margin of at least 5 million votes but President Trump hasn't conceded and may never do so. A defeated incumbent, an election that underlined the deep partisan polarisation of the American nation and a President-Elect who appealed in his acceptance speech to the "better angels…
 
Rasmus Nielsen speaks to Federica Cherubini about her report looking at the central challenges facing news organisations in 2020 according to a survey of 136 newsroom leaders from around the world Rasmus Nielsen speaks to Federica Cherubini about her report looking at the central challenges facing news organisations in 2020 according to a survey of…
 
Kathy English, former public editor of the Toronto Star, discusses what public editors do, their role in ensuring accountability to readers, and how reader engagement via public editors has changed over the years. Meera Selva speaks to Kathy English, former public editor of the Toronto Star, about what public editors do, their role in ensuring acco…
 
Rebecca Skippage, leader of the BBC’s Disinformation Team, discusses it's efforts to address mis/disinformation, its decisions about weighing in on misleading or false information and the disinformation unit’s relations with the rest of the BBC Meera Selva speaks with Rebecca Skippage who leads the BBC’s Disinformation Team. They discuss the broadc…
 
In September 1960 Fidel Castro, leader of the Cuban revolution and hipster lodestar for the countercultural left visited the belly of the beast, New York City, to attend the UN General Assembly. It was a visit that exposed the contradictions and tensions within the United States' efforts to present itself as the last best hope for the free world at…
 
'Influencers' are here like never before...log on to social media, and there will be someone there to tell you what to cook or what to wear...But what about when it comes to wildlife conservation? For instance, how much impact can a celebrity have when it comes to saving an endangered species? In this episode of the Oxford Sparks Big Questions Podc…
 
As a once-in-a-lifetime election campaign nears its end, still so many questions remain unanswered. The largest question, of course, is who will win. But beyond that, other questions – such as projected turnout, the impact of mail-in voting, and the importance of ‘Never Trump’ Republican groups, remain outstanding. To answer these questions and mor…
 
Federica Cherubini speaks with Rasmus Nielsen and Richard Fletcher, two of the authors of a recent report about the coronavirus communication crisis in the UK. Federica Cherubini speaks with Rasmus Nielsen and Richard Fletcher, two of the authors of a recent report about the coronavirus communication crisis in the UK. The report stresses that a lar…
 
In this special episode, Oxford historian Charlotte Moberly tells the story of how the French intellectual and pioneer of second-wave feminism, Simone de Beauvoir was personally and intellectually transformed by her visit to America in 1947. This is the first of a new occasional series of short podcasts exploring individuals' encounters with Americ…
 
This is an audio recording of a live event held in Oxford on Oct 26, 2020 to discuss the role of race in the 2020 election. The panel were Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Wesley Lowery, Michigan State political scientist Nazita Lajevardi, and Maria Givens from the Native American Agricultural Fund. The chair is Dr Mitch Robertson, Fellow of the R…
 
Episode 21 of University Registrars Talking About Stuff welcomes Richard Calvert, Deputy Vice Chancellor Strategy and Operations at Sheffield Hallam University, for an interesting conversation about the current challenges and wider issues too. Richard talks us through his long and varied civil service career, which included major stints at DfID wor…
 
We're back with a brand new series of the 'Oxford Sparks Big Questions Podcast'! And - in the Autumn of 2020 - where else could we start but with an episode answering a big question related to COVID-19? We're all used to hearing a lot of pandemic terminology now, but it can be difficult to get to grips with exactly what all these terms mean. For in…
 
We can't imagine a political campaign without music -- whether it's an election rally, a protest movement or a TV ad, music is essential. In this episode, Adam talks to Billy Coleman, author of a recent book about music and politics in the nineteenth century United States and asks him what music brings to politics and what we can learn from it abou…
 
This is a special episode of the podcast: a panel discussion on zoom recorded on Monday 12 October, 2020, to analyse the state of the 2020 presidential race. The participants were Thomas Edsall of the New York Times, Dave Wasserman of the Cook Political Report, and Samara Klar of the University of Arizona. The chair was Adam Smith of the Rothermere…
 
In this episode Adam talks to Heather Cox Richardson about how the values the South fought for -- oligarchy, and racial and gender inequality -- outlived the Confederacy. Heather argues that American history can be understood as a conflict between oligarchs and masses. Adam asks her why that is. How does a "democracy" become an oligarchy? And is th…
 
Episode 20 of University Registrars Talking About Stuff features Steve Marshall, Secretary and Registrar at the University of the Arts London talking about lots of topical higher ed matters. Steve talks us briefly through his career and how he ended up at UAL before we explore the nature of the role of Secretary and Registrar and equivalents within…
 
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