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Welcome to the Oxford Adult ESL Conversations podcast, hosted by Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, co-author of the Oxford Picture Dictionary and series director of the new Step Forward Second Edition. In this podcast series, Jayme is joined by Adult ESL educators, thought leaders, and advocates for candid conversations about topics important to teachers in this dynamic field.
 
The Africa Oxford Initiative (AfOx) is a cross-university platform for all things Africa in Oxford. The overarching vision of AfOx is to make Africa a strategic priority for the University of Oxford, while also building equitable research collaborations between researchers and academics from African institutions and the University of Oxford. Throughout the year AfOx hosts several events and workshops about Africa-focussed research with speakers from diverse and varied academic disciplines. T ...
 
From Oxford University's Rothermere American Institute, host Professor Adam Smith talks to guests doing world-leading research that sheds light on the United States from the outside in. We ask what forces have shaped the culture and politics of the US, how its role in the world has changed and what it might be in the future. Is America now, or has it ever been, the "last best hope of earth"? Probably not, but plenty of people have thought so. We try to understand why.
 
The Stubbs Society for Defence and Foreign Affairs, founded in 1884, is Oxford University's oldest society dedicated to the study and discussion of global politics and international relations. Join us in our new regular podcast series as we sit down with leading figures from international relations, diplomacy, intelligence, the armed forces and British and global politics.
 
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Oxford-India Day

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Oxford-India Day

Oxford University

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The inaugural Oxford-India Day took place on 17 June 2011. The event aimed to celebrate the longstanding and varied links between the University and India, and to reinvigorate and strengthen those links. Over 80 external guests, representing Indian business, Indian government, UK government, Indian civil society, journalism, law and academia came to Oxford, exploring cutting-edge collaborative research; the students and staff who have come to Oxford from India; and the outstanding collection ...
 
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Oxbox Radio

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Oxbox Radio

Evan Burnham

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Check in to Miami University's #1 radio show hosted by Evan Burnham and Joe Hayden and listen as the boys give you their hilarious take on life in the fantasy land of Oxford, Ohio. Updated with a new show every week! Check out the official Spotify playlist @Oxbox Radio.
 
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Professor of Poetry

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Professor of Poetry

Oxford University

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Professor of Poetry Alice Oswald gives her lectures on poetry, language, literature, beauty and life every term. The Professor of Poetry lectures were conceived in 1708 by Berkshire landowner Henry Birkhead and began after he bequeathed some money so it could be a valuable supplement to the curriculum. He believed ‘the reading of the ancient poets gave keenness and polish to the minds of young men as well as to the advancement of more serious literature both sacred and human’. The first poet ...
 
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show series
 
From the 1980s until quite recently, the mood music of American politics was to “roll back” the public programmes created during Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal. Now, taxes and spending are rising and the New Deal – maybe in the guise of the “Green New Deal” – is cool again. Maybe government is seen, once again, as the solution to our problems rather…
 
In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic there was a lot of confusion, as we all tried to figure out what we should and shouldn't do to best protect ourselves and others. Fortunately, we now have more definitive answers to some of our most pressing questions - which are backed-up by data - including "umm...should I be wearing a mask?". As COVID c…
 
The American Civil War did not end ambiguously – it ended in complete military defeat for the South. And yet for a century and a half, it is the losers – the men who took up arms against the United States to defend the cause of human enslavement – were honoured as American heroes. None more so than Robert E. Lee. Now the immense statue of Lee that …
 
In this episode of our podcast, we explore how well women's voices are represented in the Ghanaian news media compared to those of men, based on a research project led by a prominent broadcaster and former Journalist Fellow at the Reuters Institute. We look at the reasons behind the unequal representation and treatment of female and male experts an…
 
Satellites have been orbiting our planet for the past few decades. We might be familiar with how they can be used to track weather, or beam television and phone signals around the world. But did you know, that by capturing images of the Earth outside the visible spectrum, they're able to offer a unique perspective of the ground beneath our feet? Th…
 
The shocking attacks of September 11, 2001, were one of those "wake up" moments for the US, raising troubling questions about the nation's place in the world, how it could defend itself and what kind of a country it wanted to be. Looking back with Adam at how 9/11 changed America are Prof Nazita Lajevardi (Michigan State and Oxford), an expert in t…
 
In this episode, Jayme is joined by Rebecca Barker, Programs Officer at the Oklahoma Department of Libraries. They discuss how library and community literacy programs are continuing to pivot to meet the changing needs of their communities and learners. This … Continue reading →โดย Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
 
At the close of the First World War, the U.S. Government gave the American people a choice unlike that of any other nation: to leave their dead loved ones where they fell, or repatriate them to the US for burial at home. Of the 116 000 dead, over 45 000 families made the choice to bring their dead home. In this episode, RAI Fellow Dr. Alice Kelly s…
 
From California to Greece to Australia, it seems like every time we switch on the news there's another wildfire report. Some fires are natural - in fact, they're a fundamental part of many ecosystems - but the severity and frequency of the wildfires we are now witnessing is beyond natural levels. Human-ignited "megafires" are causing devastation ac…
 
Why does Joe Biden often refer to his mother's Irish ancestry but not his father's English roots? Why does being "Irish" in America have such cachet? In this episode, Adam talks to Professors Kevin Kenny of New York University and David Gleeson from Northumbria University to explore the complex history of Irishness in American culture. From the "wi…
 
In this episode of our podcast we look at what makes a successful collaboration across international organisations and teams. Speakers:Joshua Ogawa is General Manager, Nikkei-FT Partnership at Nikkei Europe. He is in charge of day-to-day collaboration between Nikkei and the Financial Times, which the Japanese news organisation acquired in 2015. He …
 
Chocolate. It’s rare to find anyone who isn’t partial to a square or two of this delicious treat. But is its very existence in danger? (*Cue worried faces.*) In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast we chat to chocoholic and researcher Acheampong Atta-Boateng, who studies the relationship between cocoa trees and their micro-pollinators. We hear…
 
What's the role of opinion writing within journalism, including the place of opinion journalism, specifically in the news media, in a world where many of us have many ways of expressing our opinions and reading other’s opinions, including on social media? Host: Rasmus Nielsen https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/people/prof-rasmus-kleis-niels…
 
In this episode of our Future of Journalism podcast, we look at the news media's role in covering the climate crisis. We look at how newsrooms could be better structured to allow climate reporting to flourish, how to ensure climate reporting is not siloed, and the external challenges that climate reporters and journalism face in the form of disinfo…
 
This episode looks at impartiality and news and whether news audiences value journalism that takes particular perspectives on certain issues or news which presents a range of views leaving it up to the public to decide between them. Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She …
 
This episode looks at public understanding of the financial pressures that the news media is under, how much they are concerned about it, and what they think should be done. Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is an expert in newsroom operations and organisational chan…
 
In this episode, Anthony and Jayme discuss the process and benefits of pivoting to remote instruction for ESOL learners with limited digital literacy. This series has been developed specifically for Adult ESL teachers in the US and refers to course … Continue reading →โดย Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
 
This episode focuses on how people engage with local news, and the sources of information, including local news outlets, social media and others, that news audiences use for various topics. Host: Federica Cherubini is Head of Leadership Development at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. She is an expert in newsroom operations and org…
 
This episode focuses on findings around perceptions of fairness among different groups including demographic characteristics and political leaning. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. This episode focuses on findings around perceptio…
 
This episode focuses on how people get news about climate change and how this differs across different countries, age brackets and attitudes towards the issue. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. This episode focuses on how people ge…
 
Nowadays, the idea of encountering robots in our daily lives isn't pure science fiction. Many of us interact with AI every day, and the use of robots in, for example, healthcare settings, is already on the horizon. But what if something goes wrong? The RoboTIPS team at the University of Oxford is developing an innovative feature - an 'ethical black…
 
Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. Authors of the Digital News Report, the most comprehensive study of news consumption trends worldwide, discuss the key findings from this year's report. In this episode we look at the main findings…
 
Has the "American Dream" died? If the "dream" is one of a confident expectation of increasing affluence across generations, then perhaps it has. While politicians in both parties talk about a crisis of the "middle class", young people in America now find it harder to get on the property ladder, to go to College, and even to make ends meet week by w…
 
Do you remember when the price of fizzy drinks in the UK went up slightly a few years ago? Soda fans, perhaps you remember all too clearly...! Well, this was because the UK government introduced a sugar tax (or the Soft Drinks Industrial Levy, to be precise), requiring manufacturers to pay a tax on sugary drinks - a cost which was then passed on to…
 
In this podcast we look at how one of the world's leading newsrooms uses data to inform various steps of the newsmaking process in order to engage with audiences and drive subscriptions. In this podcast we look at how one of the world's leading newsrooms uses data to inform various steps of the newsmaking process in order to engage with audiences a…
 
What are we to make of the most famous of American Paradoxes: that Thomas Jefferson, who claimed as a "self-evident truth" the principle that "all men are created equal" was a slaveholder? In this episode, Adam discusses this problem with Pullitzer prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed. With the US undergoing one of the most profound racial r…
 
An arboretum could be described as a "living library". A beautifully curated collection of woody plants from across the globe, each one carefully labelled and managed. In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast we chat to Ben Jones, Arboretum Curator at the University of Oxford Botanic Garden and Harcourt Arboretum, about what makes an arboretum …
 
Has America lost its allure to the rest of the world? Has it lost its confidence, its optimism, its sense of openness? In this episode, Adam talks to Nick Bryant, the BBC correspondent in New York and author of When America Stopped Being Great about the changing image of the US between the 1980s and the present. The two discuss whether America stil…
 
The soap opera of Meghan and Harry, the deploying of Prince Philip in America's culture wars: why does the British royal family exerted so strong an appeal in republican America ? This is not a new phenomenon. Queen Victoria's son, later Edward VII, toured America on the eve of the Civil War and was greeted with adulation. What's going on? Adam tal…
 
Lockdowns, social distancing, restrictions on 'normal' activities - we've all been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. But how has it impacted on our mood and mental wellbeing? We chat to Dr Maxime Taquet from the Department of Psychiatry about 'mood homeostasis' (the interplay between people's activities and the way they feel), and how this has bee…
 
In 1980, Jimmy Carter's administration leaned on the US Olympic Committee to boycott the Moscow Games. Today, there are calls for the US to once again boycott the Olympics -- this time in Beijing. What are the lessons of the 1980 boycott? Can sport ever be an effective instrument of foreign policy? And does the US any longer have the credibility as…
 
Jenny Lind, the "Swedish Nightingale": a soprano who made strong men weep with the beauty of her voice. In this episode, Adam explores the Nightingale's sensational tour of the US in 1850-52. She was described as the "most famous woman in the world" by her promoter, the never-knowingly-unselling impresario P T Barnum. Her reputation for virtue did …
 
For World Press Freedom Day we look at the pressures on independent journalism in two EU countries In this episode of our podcast we talk to two of our Journalist Fellows about the growing pressures facing journalists and independent news media in Poland and Hungary. We look at the threats of authoritarianism, the weaponisation of advertising reven…
 
Their distinctive 'teacher teacher' call is synonymous with British gardens, but great tits are facing a big problem - climate change. As our springtime becomes warmer and begins earlier, peak caterpillar abundance is also shifting earlier. As a crucial food source for great tit chicks, this is cause for concern. In this episode of the Big Question…
 
Remember those days when it was possible to climb aboard a plane and jet off around the world? Well, while we might be yearning for foreign shores, there's no denying that air travel comes with a big ol' carbon footprint. But is it possible to make aeroplanes 'greener'? We chat to Dr Chiara Falsetti, a researcher at the Oxford Thermofluids Institut…
 
In this episode, Jayme is joined by Jenni Currie Santamaria, author of Step Forward Introductory and Levels 1 and 5. The two discuss everything about advanced learner instruction, from skills instruction to teaching idioms. This series has been developed specifically … Continue reading →โดย Jayme Adelson-Goldstein
 
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