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Kevin Muñoz, an intellectually curious immigrant from Guatemala and DACA recipient, dives deep into a wide range of topics he feels should be discussed more within the Latin American community, including business, finance, technology, politics, mental health, and more. In addition, he interviews undocumented entrepreneurs and experts from all walks of life to find out how they navigate the U.S. economy. Bonus episodes on Patreon.com/latinamericaneo 🔗LISTEN EN ESPAÑOL: https://anchor.fm/latin ...
 
Hosted by soprano and musicologist Patricia Caicedo, the 𝗟𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻 𝗔𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰𝗮𝗻 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗜𝗯𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗻 𝗔𝗿𝘁 𝗦𝗼𝗻𝗴 𝗣𝗼𝗱𝗰𝗮𝘀𝘁 is a program to discover composers, poets, songs, and everything about the world of Latin American and Spanish songs. 𝗠𝘂𝗹𝘁𝗶𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗴𝘂𝗮𝗹 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝗴𝗿𝗮𝗺 𝘄𝗶𝘁𝗵 𝗘𝗽𝗶𝘀𝗼𝗱𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗘𝗻𝗴𝗹𝗶𝘀𝗵, 𝗦𝗽𝗮𝗻𝗶𝘀𝗵, 𝗣𝗼𝗿𝘁𝘂𝗴𝘂𝗲𝘀𝗲, 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗖𝗮𝘁𝗮𝗹𝗮𝗻. 🔴Conducido por la soprano y musicóloga Patricia Caicedo, el 𝗟𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻 𝗔𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗰𝗮𝗻 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗜𝗯𝗲𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗻 𝗔𝗿𝘁 𝗦𝗼𝗻𝗴 𝗣𝗼𝗱𝗰𝗮𝘀𝘁 es un programa semanal para descubrir compositores, poetas, canciones y todo sobre el mundo ...
 
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The Latin American Briefing Series

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The Latin American Briefing Series

The University of Chicago Center for Latin American Studies

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The CLAS Latin American Briefing Series brings academic and policy experts to the University of Chicago campus to address important events and issues in contemporary Latin America. The series is supported, in part, by a Department of Education National Resource Center grant to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign/University of Chicago Consortium for Latin American Studies and is co-sponsored by the International House Global Voices Program.
 
The Latin American History Podcast aims to tell the story of Spanish and Portuguese America from its very beginnings up until the present day. Latin America’s history is home to some of the most exciting and unbelievable stories of adventure and exploration, and this podcast will tell these stories in all their glory. It will examine colonial society, slavery, and what life was like for the region’s inhabitants during this period. We will look at what caused the wars of independence, how the ...
 
History podcasts of Mexico, Latina, Latino, Hispanic, Chicana, Chicano, Mexicana, Mexicano, genealogy, mexico, mexican, mexicana, mexicano, mejico, mejicana, mejicano, hispano, hispanic, hispana, latino, latina, latin, america, espanol, espanola, spanish, indigenous, indian, indio, india, native, native american, chicano, chicana, mesoamerican, mesoamerica, raza, podcast, podcasting, nuestra, familia, or unida are welcome here. If it has to do with the history of America, California, Oregon, ...
 
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show series
 
This is part 2 of a 2-part series from Cited - the predecessor of Darts and Letters. For the final episode of our “Activism & Academia”-themed week of programming, we’re returning to Cited’s series on genetically modified corn, Indigenous rights, and environmental law in Mexico. Return with us to our story on how the discovery of genetically modifi…
 
In 1946 the United States government immorally and unethically and, arguably illegally engaged in research experiments in which more than 5000 uninformed and unconsenting Guatemalan people were intentionally infected with bacteria that cause sexually transmitted diseases. Many have been left untreated to the present day. And although US President B…
 
The Atlantic has borne witness to major historic events that have drastically shaped humanity with each crossing of its path. In A Brief History of the Atlantic (Robinson, 2022), Jeremy Black takes the reader through its evolution to becoming one of the most important oceans in the world. Black discusses the importance of the Atlantic in relation t…
 
This is part 1 of a 2-part series from Cited - the predecessor of Darts and Letters. When genetically modified corn was found in the highlands of Mexico, Indigenous campesino groups took to the streets to protect their cultural heritage, setting off a 20-year legal saga. The battle brought Indigenous rights, scientific methods, academic freedom, an…
 
In The New Pan-Americanism and the Structuring of Inter-American Relations (Routledge, 2022), David Sheinin and Juan Pablo Scarfi bring together articles that reconsider many aspects of U.S.-Latin American history. Pan-Americanism, a late nineteenth and early twentieth century movement that attempted to foster closer relations among the nations of …
 
Episode Description: First up - Last Thursday, the democrats on Capitol Hill introduced legislation that could restore net neutrality and the authority of the Federal Communications Commission to regulate broadband. Our second story - Russia will withdraw from the International Space Station (ISS) after 2024 and build its own orbital station, accor…
 
The Brazilian Northeast has long been a marginalized region with a complex relationship to national identity. It is often portrayed as impoverished, backward, and rebellious, yet traditional and culturally authentic. Brazil is known for its strong national identity, but national identities do not preclude strong regional identities. In Region Out o…
 
The term cacica was a Spanish linguistic invention, the female counterpart to caciques, the Arawak word for male indigenous leaders in Spanish America. But the term’s meaning was adapted and manipulated by natives, creating a new social stratum where it previously may not have existed. This book explores that transformation, a conscious constructio…
 
Episode Description: Enovid, the world's first birth control ushered in a new era of sexual autonomy for women. It was marketed as a safe, clinically tested way to take control of reproductive health. The pill had a bright future, but its past is intertwined with eugenics and colonialism. Its clinical trials took place not in the mainland United St…
 
EPISODE DESCRIPTION: Danna is the founder of CaliDanna Boutique CaliDanna Mission: CaliDanna was created for the joyful, independent, and romantic woman that expresses her passion through clothes and style. We envision her feeling confident while wearing our CaliDanna pieces throughout the special occasion of her life. Our mission as a brand is to …
 
In this podcast Laura A. Ogden, cultural anthropologist at Dartmouth College, introduces her beautifully crafted book Loss and Wonder at the World's End (Duke University Press, 2021). In Loss and Wonder at the World's End, Ogden brings together animals, people, and things—from beavers, stolen photographs, lichen, American explorers, and birdsong—to…
 
A legacy of the transatlantic slave trade, Brazil is home to the largest number of African descendants outside Africa and the greatest number of domestic workers in the world. Drawing on ten years of interviews and ethnographic research, Second-Class Daughters: Black Brazilian Women and Informal Adoption as Modern Slavery (Cambridge University Pres…
 
Latino Tik-Tok star Leo González born and raised in Hanford, California has mixed comedy and culture to amass more than 2m followers and more than 66m likes in less than two years on Tik-Tok. His big break came when impersonated a Univision anchor and reporter. “Leo's goal is to try and bridge Latinos with everyone else” and to help bring people to…
 
For today's tech episode. We’re going to be talking about... the crisis of e-waste and children’s health. We’ll specifically be referencing a report by the World Health Organization from 2021 titled “Children and digital dumpsites: e-waste exposure and child health” The report summarizes the latest scientific knowledge on the links between informal…
 
Daniel Silva’s Embodying Modernity: Global Fitness Culture and Building the Brazilian Body (U Pittsburgh Press, 2022) examines the current boom of fitness culture in Brazil in the context of the white patriarchal notions of race, gender, and sexuality through which fitness practice, commodities, and cultural products traffic. The book traces the im…
 
In Bedlam in the New World: A Mexican Madhouse in the Age of Enlightenment (UNC Press, 2022), Cristina Ramos tells us the story of Mexico city’s oldest public institution for the insane, the Hospital de San Hipólito. This institution, founded in 1567, was the first mental hospital in the New World. Remarkable as this fact may be, this book is not s…
 
Vanessa Walker's Principles in Power: Latin America and the Politics of U. S. Human Rights Diplomacy (Cornell University Press, 2020) explores the relationship between policy makers and nongovernment advocates in Latin America and the United States government in order to explain the rise of anti-interventionist human rights policies uniquely critic…
 
Esther Villegas-Sandoval is a sociology professor at the College of the Sequoias. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from California State University, Northridge where she focused her studies on the experiences of undocumented college students in Southern California. Her areas of research and expertise include the experiences & identi…
 
In Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations (Manchester UP, 2021), Dr. Sophie Haspeslagh offers a systematic examination of the impact of proscription on peace negotiations. With rare access to actors during the Colombian negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People's Army (FARC), Dr. Haspe…
 
In this episode of the New Books in Latin America Studies podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Dr Francesca Lessa about her interesting new book The Condor Trials: Transnational Repression and Human Rights in South America published in 2022 by the Yale University Press. Stories of transnational terror and justice illuminate the past and present of S…
 
Kicking off Season 4 with how bananas led to the CIA overthrowing the democratically elected government of Guatemala, violently reversing the progressive policies of the civilian governments. A coup that was ordered by the United Fruit Company ushering a 36-year civil war claiming the lives of about 200,000 people. BONUS EPISODES Patreon: ✨www.patr…
 
Did you know that there was an important operatic activity in Brazil during the XVII and XVIII centuries? Did you know that there were opera houses in many Brazilian cities where European and local artists performed together, including mulatos, blacks, and women? In the second season premiere, Patricia Caicedo talks to Dr. Rogerio Budasz, a Brazili…
 
Minoritarian Liberalism: A Travesti Life in a Brazilian Favela (University of Chicago Press, 2022) is a mesmerizing ethnography of the largest favela in Rio, where residents articulate their own politics of freedom against the backdrop of multiple forms of oppression. Normative liberalism has promoted the freedom of privileged subjects, those entit…
 
In today’s episode of How To Be Wrong we welcome Dr. Khytie Brown, who is an assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Brown’s research examines the intersections of religion, race, gender and sexual alterity, criminality, material culture, sensory epistemologies and social media practices …
 
Argentina lies at the heart of the American hemisphere's history of global migration booms of the mid-nineteenth to early twentieth century: by 1910, one of every three Argentine residents was an immigrant—twice the demographic impact that the United States experienced in the boom period. In this context, some one hundred and forty thousand Ottoman…
 
A new generation of Afro-Brazilian media producers have emerged to challenge a mainstream that frequently excludes them. Reighan Gillam delves into the dynamic alternative media landscape developed by Afro-Brazilians in the twenty-first century. With works that confront racism and focus on Black characters, these artists and the visual media they c…
 
In this podcast, Lisa Blackmore, Senior Lecturer in the School of Philosophy, History and Interdisciplinary Studies Centre at the University of Essex, and Liliana Gomez, Professor of Art and Society at the University of Kassel, introduce their edited volume Liquid Ecologies in Latin American and Caribbean art (Routledge, 2020) and the multiple ways…
 
For five hundred years, Latina/o culture and identity have been shaped by their challenges to the religious, socio-economic, and political status quo, whether in opposition to Spanish colonialism, Latin American dictatorships, US imperialism in Central America, the oppression of farmworkers, or the current exploitation of undocumented immigrants. C…
 
The life and legacy of a young Argentinian woman whose disappearance in 1976 haunts those she left behind It started with a coincidence--when Marc Raboy happened to discover that he shared a surname with a young leftwing Argentinian journalist who in June 1976 was ambushed by a rightwing death squad while driving with her family in the city of Mend…
 
Normative liberalism has promoted the freedom of privileged subjects, those entitled to rights—usually white, adult, heteronormative, and bourgeois—at the expense of marginalized groups, such as Black people, children, LGBTQ people, and slum dwellers. In this visceral ethnography of Rocinha, the largest favela in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Moisés Lino…
 
What drives and sustains participation in unemployed workers’ movements in Argentina? Today’s guest, Marcos Perez, is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Washington and Lee University and author of the new book, Proletarian Lives. Routines, Identity and Culture in Contentious Politics. Marcos talks about how he ca…
 
In Engendering Islands: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Violence in the Early French Caribbean (University of Nebraska Press, 2021), Dr. Ashley M. Williard demonstrates how problematics of gender played a central role in defining colonial others, male and female, at the moment when slavery was first introduced in the French-controlled Antilles. The bo…
 
Today I spoke to Anjanette Delgado, a Puerto Rican writer and journalist based in Miami who has compiled emblematic stories and essays by writers from many countries who congregate in the city of Miami and the state of Florida. The stories are about those who have been touched by the Florida and Miami experience, and who have made the state their h…
 
It is 2084. Climate change has made life on the Caribbean island of Bajacu a gruelling trial. The sun is so hot that people must sleep in the day and live and work at night. In a world of desperate scarcity, people who reach forty are expendable. Those who still survive in the cities and towns are ruled over by the brutal, fascistic Domins, and the…
 
In Affect, Ecofeminism, and Intersectional Struggles in Latin America: A Tribute to Berta Cáceres (Peter Lang, 2020), Irune del Rio Gabiola examines the power of affect in structuring decolonizing modes of resistance performed by social movements such as COPINH (Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras). Despite a harsh leg…
 
In this episode of the New Books in Latin America podcast, Kenneth Sánchez spoke with Lorena Cuya Gavilano about her interesting new book Fictions of Migration: Narratives of Displacement in Peru and Bolivia published in 2021 by the Ohio State University Press. This book analyses the impact of political and economic trends on migration narratives a…
 
In 2014 Barbados introduced a vaccine to prevent certain strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and reduce the risk of cervical cancer in young women. Despite the disproportionate burden of cervical cancer in the Caribbean, many Afro-Barbadians chose not to immunize their daughters. In Suspicion: Vaccines, Hesitancy, and the Affective Politics o…
 
Bad Mexicans: Race, Empire, and Revolution in the Borderlands (Norton, 2022)tells the dramatic story of the magonistas, the migrant rebels who sparked the 1910 Mexican Revolution from the United States. Led by a brilliant but ill-tempered radical named Ricardo Flores Magón, the magonistas were a motley band of journalists, miners, migrant workers, …
 
The Religion of Life: Eugenics, Race, and Catholicism in Chile (U Pittsburgh Press, 2021) examines the interconnections and relationship between Catholicism and eugenics in early twentieth-century Chile. Specifically, it demonstrates that the popularity of eugenic science was not diminished by the influence of Catholicism there. In fact, both eugen…
 
João B. Chaves analyzes the first hundred years of Southern Baptist missionary activity in Brazil to reveal how the racialized practices of Southern Baptist Convention missionaries in the largest Latin America country shaped aspects of Latin American evangelicalism in general and the Brazilian Baptist Convention in particular. Partially because the…
 
In The Lettered Barriada: Workers, Archival Power, and the Politics of Knowledge in Puerto Rico (Duke UP, 2021), Jorell A. Meléndez-Badillo tells the story of how a cluster of self-educated workers burst into Puerto Rico's world of letters and navigated the colonial polity that emerged out of the 1898 US occupation. They did so by asserting themsel…
 
In Planetary Longings (Duke UP, 2022), eminent cultural theorist Mary Louise Pratt posits that the last decade of the twentieth century and the first decades of the twenty-first mark a turning point in the human and planetary condition. Examining the forces of modernity, neoliberalism, coloniality, and indigeneity in their pre- and postmillennial f…
 
An interview with Fernanda Melchor, finalist for the International Booker Prize, and author most recently of Paradais (New Directions, 2022). And Sophie Hughes, the English translator of Fernanda’s two novels, and winner of the Pen Translates Award. In a wide-ranging discussion, we touch upon the ways in which translation is akin to friendship, and…
 
Recent global events have unmasked inequitable healthcare systems that disproportionately affect poor Latinx populations along the U.S-Mexico border. Professor Jennifer K. Seman’s recent publication offers a brief insight into these inequities by approaching borderlands modes of care from a historical perspective to reveal how two vital practitione…
 
Following the recent global housing boom, tract housing development became a billion-dollar industry in Mexico. At the national level, neoliberal housing policy has overtaken debates around land reform. For Indigenous peoples, access to affordable housing remains crucial to alleviating poverty. But as palapas, traditional thatch and wood houses, ar…
 
Another season down in the books! The official end of Season 3 Finale announcement, Patrons shoutouts, and things I’ll be working on during the downtime for season 4. BONUS EPISODES Patreon: ✨www.patreon.com/latinamericaneo✨ 👉Website: www.latinamericaneo.org 👉Instagram: @latinamericaneo 🛍 Merch:https://latinamericaneo.org/shop 🔗LISTEN EN ESPAÑOL: h…
 
In Technology of the Oppressed: Inequity and the Digital Mundane in Favelas of Brazil (MIT Press, 2022), David Nemer draws on extensive ethnographic fieldwork to provide a rich account of how favela residents engage with technology in community technology centers and in their everyday lives. Their stories reveal the structural violence of the infor…
 
The 1980s and '90s saw Latin American governments recognizing the property rights of Indigenous and Afro-descendent communities as part of a broader territorial policy shift. But the resulting reforms were not applied consistently, more often extending neoliberal governance than recognizing Indigenous Peoples' rights. In Negotiating Autonomy: Mapuc…
 
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