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Using case studies that often go untouched in news media, we examine how global trends are impacting real lives and international politics. Global Inquirer is a production of the International Relations Organization at the University of Virginia. We are also affiliated with TEEJ.fm, the podcast network of the University of Virginia and Charlottesville. Music: Audissey https://open.spotify.com/artist/27PasEOltfafDKVv1TPTQR
 
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Germany’s upcoming federal election to determine the successor to Angela Merkel, chancellor of Germany, marks a critical juncture in German foreign policy. An increasingly important foreign policy flashpoint is Germany’s relationship with China – especially in the context of Germany’s 5G rollout. In this episode, we walk you through the impact of M…
 
What happens when large groups of retail investors are able to congregate through the internet to control the direction of a stock price? In this episode, we investigate the formation and purpose of online discussion forums and the ways they have been able to impact the stock market. Specifically, we dive into the subreddit r/wallstreetbets as it i…
 
Billions of dollars go to foreign aid every year, but what happens when aid is mishandled, misused, or misallocated? Host Emma Ross and Executive Producer Sarah Rocca sit down with guest Daniel Altman, the former USAID Assistant Inspector General for Investigations, to discuss fraud within foreign aid assistance and the systems in place to prevent …
 
(Disinformation, Russian) What is the effect of fake news on public health in the context of a pandemic? This episode explores the nature of fake news itself and its history and examines the proliferation of COVID-19 fake news in Eastern Europe. These stories are causing widespread vaccine skepticism, threatening public health in countries such as …
 
Although Kyrgyzstan rarely makes the front page of the news, this Central-Asian nation has a fascinating history. From 1991, when Kyrgyzstan became independent from the Soviet Union to the present day in 2021, three of their democratically-elected presidents have been unseated by protesters and civil unrest. In this episode, we dive into Kyrgyzstan…
 
As COVID-19 has ravaged the world, some countries have responded better than others. New Zealand and Germany have outperformed nations like the United States and Great Britain, and many attribute this success to the leadership of women like Jacinda Ardern and Angela Merkel. In this episode, four of our researchers take on a psychological question w…
 
As students departed Charlottesville given the University's decision to send everyone home in late March, 2020, a proportion of out-of-state students would journey back to their homes in California, Oregon, and Washington. To many, the University's decision to suspend class is the novel coronavirus' first distinct intrusion into daily life. These s…
 
What’s the difference between data privacy and protection? Season 8's premiere episode takes a deep dive into exploring this question with expert interviews addressing how your data is used in the emerging personal information economy, the implications of national data sovereignty measures, and why Uber and TikTok are the subject of data privacy co…
 
In short, our world is occupied with the coronavirus. New stories from experts come out every day talking about the ever-growing death toll, testing availability issues, and economic downturn. However, we have not heard much about the perspectives from college students around the world who have had to leave their campuses (or as UVA students call o…
 
This episode explores how Indigenous people around the world engage with their respective governments to reclaim their land and resist the legacies of oppression that have disadvantaged their communities over the generations. Tune in to third-year Global Development Studies Major Roma Chitko to hear more. Host: Emma RossResearcher: Roma ChitkoProdu…
 
(Humanity, Democracy, long standing Hindu-Muslim amity in Kashmir)Kashmir has been a geopolitically tense region for about a quarter of a century now. India and Pakistan have fought three wars over the region, and there continue to be regular skirmishes between soldiers of the two countries there. Moreover, the conflict has led to thousands of deat…
 
As climate change threatens ecologies and challenges policy makers worldwide, Russia finds itself in a unique place. Already, powerful and bizarre effects of climate change are impacting regions in Siberia, sparking cultural changes and threatening to destabilize ways of life. How does Putin’s administration view climate change? What stands in the …
 
Shadowy foreign governments, a powerless Federal Reserve, and a clandestine currency market controlled only by the world's most elite international bankers. This is the story of the Eurodollar: a financial term as mysterious as the saga behind it. What began as a popular method for foreign countries and corporations to subvert US law grew into a se…
 
"Yeh jo des tera" is Hindi for "This country of yours." One India caught between two choices; to support or reject a controversial piece of legislation. You may have heard of the Indian citizenship act, but what is it really? Does it discriminate against Muslims or provide a helpful path to citizenship for minorities? Tune into the Global Inquirer’…
 
On January 3, 2020 — three days before the first reporting of a mysterious viral pneumonia appeared in the New York Times — the United States assassinated Iranian general Qasem Soleimani. Host Emma Ross and Researcher Ari Ghasemian discuss the man, the myth, and the drone strike. How can we situate recent events in terms of the rhetoric and history…
 
Facing discrimination, mass beatings, rape, and torture in their native country of Myanmar, the Rohingya people have fled to nearby Bangladesh, where the crisis has created the largest refugee camp in the world. In this week’s episode, we unpack the contrasting narratives of the Myanmar government and UN officials in regard to the treatment of the …
 
This week, executive producer Emi Lockwood investigates the recent Argentine presidential elections. The incumbent Mauricio Macri lost to Alberto Fernandez and Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner (no relation) who ran as vice president. With a 57 billion IMF loan looming over the country, what does Cristina’s return to power mean for the future of Argen…
 
This week on the Global Inquirer, we take a look at the modern implications of mandatory military service and how the service affects these countries as a whole. We look at the reasons for why countries chose to draft their own citizens and how their cultures are later impacted. Additionally, we discuss the distinctions between mandatory services i…
 
President Trump, Mike Pompeo, and Rudy Giuliani love to hate the current Iranian regime. Now, it seems they’ve settled on even more dangerous alternative: the MEK. Researcher Ari Ghasemian takes us through this group’s journey from terrorist organization to the forefront of US foreign policy.Host: Balthazar MerrinResearcher: Ari GhasemianProducer: …
 
Democracy has always been the solution of the western world, but is it the best option for Latin America? Researcher Sarah Rocca looks at protests in Puerto Rico and the dictatorship in Venezuela to answer this question. With information from the Concordia International Conference and global news, this episode looks at how democracy is affecting re…
 
The West cheers and hails protests in Russia with the hope that the people will one day overcome Putin. But as researchers Katya Sankow and Anna Von Spakovsky explain, promoting protests are not as pro-democratic as we’d hope. It was in fact the Bolshevik Revolution through protests that created the Soviet Union. Mass demonstrations have a deep his…
 
Sticks and stones may break my bones, and gaffes might hurt me too. Researcher Nick Mortensen spoke with Professor Brad Carson about the impact of embarrassing gaffes in politics. It turns out that awkward moments don’t necessarily end political careers. Rather, blunders stick and stain a politician’s reputation when the blunder fits into a narrati…
 
Gone are the days when countries bought vast quantities of foreign territory in the interest of expanding their borders...or are they? Beginning with President Trump's interest in a purchase of Greenland, we look both at the history of nations buying control over one another, as well as a glance to the future. What happens when nations are forced t…
 
Imagine being imprisoned for praying. Imagine being unable to communicate with your family. For the Uighurs in Eastern China, this is a reality. Every part of their identity as Muslims is being systematically erased: their mosques, their language, their culture. On our last episode of the season, we cover the humanitarian crisis unfolding in China.…
 
We’ve all heard and even experienced the impacts of social media: the distraction, the anxiety of checking likes. Today, our technical director Andy Carluccio steps up as the host to talk about social media with researcher Sarah Rocca. Social media is designed to be addicting, so how do users and governments alike tackle the addiction? Using case s…
 
It’s fair to assume that hummus has become a widely popular grocery staple in the US. Its murky origins, however, have rendered it a symbol of political tensions in the Middle East. The cultural dispute over hummus ownership has indeed been absorbed into the general framework of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Researcher Gabriella Soriano interviewed Pr…
 
Join UVA’s premier undergraduate research podcast, the Global Inquirer for a special discussion on housing development, inequality and activism to gain a better understanding of our community. The event featured community leaders and activists as well as Andrew Kahrl, professor of History and African American studies here at UVA.Check out the broad…
 
On today's episode, editor-in-chief Emi Lockwood interviewed John Sipher, former Clandestine Service officer at the CIA. They discussed heightened tensions between India and Pakistan, the U.S. North Korea summit, and the Michael Cohen hearing for the House Oversight Committee. The interview was conducted on March 1st, so things might have changed s…
 
Iran is so often perceived as a dangerous country that is too difficult to understand. Today, we challenge that assumption, giving you a basic framework of what happened in 20th century Iran to understand the present. New researchers Ari Ghasemian and Gabierlla Soriano interviewed Professor Nader Entessar to understand the current Iran Nuclear Deal…
 
The way we live matters now more than ever. The decision between walking or driving to the grocery store is not as much of a personal choice, it’s about how cities and suburbs are built to help its citizens. Today, researchers Emma Ross and Tyler Hinkle discuss how we can rethink transportation and city development. Emma spoke with residents of Mos…
 
What if you had to flee your home because it was swallowed by the sea? According to the Climate and Migration Coalition, In 2015, 24 million people were forced to vacate their homes in face of environmental problems like rising sea levels or catastrophic storms. Today, researchers Walter Sharon and Quincy Stiles discuss the topic of climate change …
 
Give me two examples of animals that are suffering because of climate change. Polar bears and helpless sea turtles, right? In our first episode of Season 5, we sit down with Dr. Reese Halter to discuss how bees and potatoes are endangered by climate change. It turns out that the effects of rising global temperatures are broader than we anticipated.…
 
The long-term consequences of American nuclear tests rarely receive much attention. Even the largest tests in American history are rarely seen as anything more than an episode in the greater history of the Cold War. With the atmospheric tests long halted, and the Cold War over, what have these tests left behind? In the Marshall Islands in the Pacif…
 
The Nord Stream 2 Natural Gas pipeline has been a major point of contention within Europe and the NATO alliance, but why? Why is the pipeline so important? Why are the United States and Ukraine so intent on stopping it? Why is Germany so willing to receive energy resources from an adversary? What are the environmental impacts? Tune in to find out!H…
 
Join host Nick Mortensen and technical director Andy Carluccio as they review the season and discuss their favorite production moments so far!Host: Nick MortensenProducer: Andy CarluccioThe Global Inquirer is a production of the International Relations Organization at UVA, and affiliated with TEEJ, UVA’s podcasting network.…
 
?Greece's economic troubles were widely known but hardly understood. Most of us were content to know that a debt crisis was happening, some protests got violent, and bailout measures were eventually approved. What happened afterwards? Why did the crisis actually happen? Are there any enduring consequences of the economic crisis? Listen to first yea…
 
Numerous high-profile Chinese officials and cultural figures have disappeared, leaving with nothing more than cryptic notices and vague accusations from the Chinese government. Why have these people disappeared, and why have these cases flown under the radar?Host: Nicholas Mortensen Researchers: Derrick WangProducer: Andy CarluccioThe Global Inquir…
 
Catch the video version on Facebook at:https://www.facebook.com/GlobalInquireratUVA/videos/2237297219888119/Join UVA's premier undergraduate research podcast, "The Global Inquirer," for a special panel and discussion with Dr. Katie Hasson from the Center for Genetics and Society about the political, social, and privacy ramifications of genetic and …
 
Our understanding of poaching of endangered species in Africa can be charitably described as "simplistic." Most of us don't even see Ivory, Rhino Horn, or other products, but did you know that the United States is one of the largest markets for these products? Did you know that most poachers are locals acting out on economic necessity? The story is…
 
"With the help of UVA Sustainability, the Global Inquirer takes a closer look at what actually goes on after you throw something in the recycling bin. Recycling is a business, but recent global trends might be threatening how lucrative it actually is. Find out how your old cans, local recycling businesses, and global trade all intersect, and how yo…
 
Sanctions, Soccer, and ScandalSanctions are a tool of foreign policy that are both overused and hardly understood. Some praise them as a decisive punishment and a cure-all of sorts, while others dismiss them as useless after of political theater. In these sweeping generalizations, the truth of the matter is lost. When do sanctions come into play? W…
 
Piracy has risen in Venezuela, but it's different from either the swashbuckling romanticism of "old" piracy or the merchant ship heists and hostage crises in international waters off Somalia. Piracy in Venezuela is smaller and fluid. Sometimes the pirates brutally kill their victims and steal their possessions, while other times they simply target …
 
As students return from programs abroad, they bring stories and perspectives that cannot be found anywhere else. Four students have traveled across the world and experienced different cultures, but also observed similar trends. What stories bind all of these journeys together? What trends transcend thousands of miles?Host: Nick MortensenResearchers…
 
"After a season that explored trends across the world, researchers Katya Sankow, Tyler Hinkle, Kara Kreiling, and Emi Lockwood sit down to reflect on the trends discussed this season, and the overarching dynamics that tie them all together."Host: Nick MortensenResearchers: Katya Sankow, Tyler Hinkle, Kara Kreiling, and Emi LockwoodProducer: Andy Ca…
 
Russia will be hosting the World Cup in 2018, in the midst of heavy international criticism, corruption, and controversy. Why is Russia hosting this event? What purpose does it serve? Are there other international influences or trends at play? Join researchers Roma Chitko and Walter Sharon, and Professor Natalie Koch as we answer these questions an…
 
Today we are releasing a special episode of Global Inquirer, a thank you podcast for our now former host and editor-in-chief, Niko Marcich. Niko started this podcast and built if from the ground up, a testament not only to his dedication and work ethic, but also to his amazing leadership abilities.Our research team put together a video, released he…
 
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