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In this episode Amanda tells us the first half of a two part story for the first time! Husband and wife, Harold Henthorn and Toni Bertolet Henthorn, went on a hike through the Rocky Mountains to celebrate their anniversary. However one of them didn't make it home from the trip, and there were some very suspicious things that came to light after. Le…
 
Jonathan Franzen’s new novel, “Crossroads,” has generated a lot of discussion, as his work tends to do. The novelist and critic Thomas Mallon, who reviewed “Crossroads” for us, is on the podcast this week to talk about the book and to place it in the context of Franzen’s entire career. “He is fundamentally a social novelist, and his basic unit of s…
 
Canadian comedian and my old housemate Dana Alexander came to visit! An international headliner, podcaster, presenter and COOK (spelt in capital letter for a reason, this woman THROWS DOWN in the kitchen), we chat about how to deal with kids who say problematic things, why it's good to eat unhealthy stuff, gender, giving our parents grandchildren..…
 
In this episode Tabitha tells the story of Nikki Whitehead. Nikki became a mother of two at a young age. She was living with her boyfriend and the girls at his house when one day the girls come home from school to find their mother had been killed in a very gruesome scene. Who would have wanted Nikki dead? Grab your glass of wine and join us to fin…
 
In 2013, the front page of The New York Times devoted five straight days to the story of Dasani, an 11-year-old Black girl who lived in a homeless shelter in Brooklyn. Now, Andrea Elliott, the reporter of that series, has published her first book, “Invisible Child,” which tells the full story of Dasani and her family up to the present day. On this …
 
In this episode Amanda tells the story of two young friends that went missing, Dana Woods and June Guerry. There were multiple suspects, however this case only took 5 days to solve. Join us with your glass of wine to find out what happened to these girls, and who took their lives way too early. Cheers! Follow us on- Facebook: https://www.facebook.c…
 
In “Bewilderment,” Richard Powers’s first novel since he won a Pulitzer Prize for “The Overstory,” an astrobiologist named Theo Byrne looks for life on other planets while struggling to raise his highly sensitive 9-year-old son, Robin. On this week’s podcast, Powers compares Theo’s work in the galaxy with his relationship on the ground. “If there a…
 
In this episode Tabitha tells the story of Linda Curry. Linda was newly in love and had just gotten married, however shortly after the wedding Linda started getting very sick. She was so sick that she even ended up in the ER a few times, but no one could figure out why she was sick. Then one night her husband woke up and found that Linda was no lon…
 
The Harvard law professor Randall Kennedy’s new book, “Say It Loud!,” collects 29 of his essays. Kennedy’s opinions about the subjects listed in the book’s subtitle — race, law, history and culture — tend to be complex, and he’s not afraid to change his mind. He says on the podcast that there’s “no shame” in admitting you’re wrong, and that he does…
 
In this episode Amanda tells us the story of Claire Hough who was brutally murdered on the beach. There was a possibility it was also connected to another murder years before, however something happens to all the suspects police had... Was it coincidence? Was it guilt? Join us to find out what happened to the all the suspects in this case, and see …
 
Colson Whitehead’s new novel, “Harlem Shuffle,” revolves around Ray Carney, a furniture retailer in Harlem in the 1960s with a sideline in crime. It’s a relatively lighthearted novel, certainly compared to “The Underground Railroad” and “The Nickel Boys,” Whitehead’s two previous novels, each of which won the Pulitzer Prize. “I usually do a lighter…
 
In this episode Tabitha talks about how the missing persons case of Joseph Anthony Tarricone gets solved. He was a traveling meat salesman who was on his way back to where he worked in Alaska when he suddenly went missing. Although his family never gave up, the case still went cold for 30 years. Join us to find out how a 30 year old cold case gets …
 
The novelist Brandon Taylor, who has generated his own buzz with his debut novel, “Real Life,” and a collection of stories, “Filthy Animals,” visits the podcast to discuss the much-discussed work of Sally Rooney. Taylor recently reviewed her third novel, “Beautiful World, Where Are You.” On the podcast, he describes Rooney’s writing as an “intense,…
 
In this episode Amanda tells us something other than a murder story, she tells us about a missing persons case. Macin Smith was 17 years old when he seemingly up and vanished. He left home one day and never returned. Did he leave on his own, or did something happen to him? Since this case is unsolved we may never know, but with the details Amanda t…
 
“Out on a Limb” is a selection of Andrew Sullivan’s essays from the past 32 years of American history. On this week’s podcast, Sullivan talks about the book and his feelings about some of the very contentious public arguments in which he’s been involved. “You’re never at a moment of finality in politics or intellectual life. You’re always just abou…
 
In this episode I am joined by royalty, the Cockney Prince himself, Quincy the Comedian! We talk about vaccine hesitancy in the Black community, being in a dance crew in the 80s and what it's like to hear your first pub shooting as an eight year old. Quincy is a comedian, radio host, actor (catch him in In The Long Run on Sky) and promoter. One of …
 
In this episode Tabitha does her first unsolved story! It was just supposed to be a fun camping trip with a few friends, but it ended in a brutal way. We go over a few suspects, evidence, and theories that police and investigators had, then we end the episode with a quick discussion of our own theories as to what happened during that camping trip! …
 
A.O. Scott, The Times’s co-chief film critic, returns to the Book Review’s podcast this week to discuss the work of William Maxwell, the latest subject in Scott’s essay series The Americans, about writers who give a sense of the country’s complex identity. In his novels and stories, Maxwell frequently returned to small-town Illinois, and to, as Sco…
 
In this episode Amanda tells us about a young couple that goes missing. With their family's in search for answers and desperate for police to understand they didn't just leave on their own, will the family get their answers in the end? Join us to find out! Follow us on- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tcuncorked Instagram: https://www.instagram.…
 
In her new book, “The Brilliant Abyss,” Helen Scales writes about the largely unseen realm of the deepest parts of the ocean. On this week’s podcast, she talks about the life down there — and how long it took us to realize there was any at all. “It wasn’t so long ago, maybe 200 years ago, that most people — scientists, the brightest minds we had — …
 
This week Tabitha tells the story of Stephanie "Shea" Graham. Stephanie was a young 20 year old woman from Phenix City, Alabama. It was very late one night when a truck driver noticed a body on the side of a dirt road, the body was later identified as Stephanie Graham. What happened to this young woman and how did she end up here? Join us to find o…
 
In Dana Spiotta’s new novel, “Wayward,” a woman named Sam buys a dilapidated house in a neglected neighborhood in Syracuse, leaving her husband and her daughter in order to face down big midlife questions. “She is what we used to call a housewife, a stay-at-home mom,” Spiotta says on this week’s podcast, describing her protagonist. “She has one dau…
 
In this episode Amanda tells the story of Lauri Waterman. She lived with her husband and daughter in small town Craig, Alaska. Her husband and daughter are both away for a weekend, and when they return home Lauri is missing. Join us to find out what happened to Lauri. Follow us on- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tcuncorked Instagram: https://ww…
 
The slightly directionless, unnamed narrator of Katie Kitamura’s fourth novel, “Intimacies,” takes a job as a translator at an international criminal court. On this week’s podcast, Kitamura talks about the novel, including her realization about the book’s title. “‘Intimacy’ as a word is something that we think of as desirable, and something that we…
 
In this episode I am joined by the irrepressible Ria Lina. As well as being a top notch comedian, Ria has a BSc in Experimental Pathology, an MSc in Forensic Science and a PhD in Virology. More degrees that you can shake a Polaroid picture at. She's a fab talker and our conversation covered more miles than Ellen MacArthur. From breastfeeding to the…
 
In this episode Tabitha finally covers the serial killer she has been talking about! Herbert Mullin was a well liked kid and seemed to have everything going for him, that is until his best friend dies and things go downhill from there. He suffers from schizophrenia, and throughout this story we hear the thoughts and things he would be hearing from …
 
Omar El Akkad’s new novel, “What Strange Paradise,” uses some fablelike techniques to comment on the migrant crisis caused by war in the Middle East. El Akkad explains that he thinks of the novel as a reinterpretation of the story of Peter Pan, told as the story of a contemporary child refugee. “There’s this thing Borges once said about how all lit…
 
In this episode Amanda tells the story of Jessica Carpenter. In order to find Jessica's murderer police go through hundreds of DNA tests and a lot of twists and turns. Get ready for the ride Amanda takes us on, and see if you can figure out who did it before she reveals it! Follow us on- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tcuncorked Instagram: http…
 
The latest pick for Group Text, our monthly column for readers and book clubs, is Esther Freud's “I Couldn’t Love You More,” a novel about three generations of women grappling with secrets, shame and an inexorable bond. Elisabeth Egan, an editor at the Book Review and the brains behind Group Text, talks about the novel on this week’s podcast. “It’s…
 
Alex Wheatle keeps my company in this episode. Yes, THE Alex Wheatle - author of countless novels, activist and subject of the Small Axe episode that told us we all need a Simian in our lives. We talk about unlearning inferiority, putting on fake accents and how to get your first book published. This chat was as delicious as the plantain I finally …
 
This week Tabitha tells the story about a family that up and vanishes. We find out what happened to some of them, however for one of the family members the case is still unsolved. Follow us on- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tcuncorked Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/truecrimeuncorked/?utm_medium=copy_link&fbclid=IwAR1JXZXUNMG6Fvv5507Q2lRm…
 
On this week’s podcast, S.A. Cosby says that a writer friend once told him: “I think you’re like the bard of broken men.” In Cosby’s new novel, “Razorblade Tears,” the fathers of two married gay men who have just been murdered team up to track down the killers. Cosby says that the fathers — Ike, who’s Black, and Buddy Lee, who’s white — are familia…
 
This weeks episode we announce the winner of our Giveaway for a True Crime Uncorked wine glass! Amanda also takes us on a crazy journey with her story! This one was filled with lots of interesting twists, turns, and even a deadly bottle of wine! Follow us on- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tcuncorked Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/truecri…
 
The subtitle of Jonathan Balcombe’s new book, “Super Fly: The Unexpected Lives of the World’s Most Successful Insects” leads to the first question on this week’s podcast. Why “successful”? “Their diversity, for one,” Balcombe says. “There’s over 160,000 described species — and it’s important to add that qualifier, ‘described,’ because it’s estimate…
 
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