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About Any Questions? WAMC's Friday quiz segment, Any Questions? , puts news director Ian Pickus in the hot seat, as he and listeners field questions from resident quizzer Mike Nothnagel. Nothnagel is Associate Professor of mathematics at The Culinary Institute of America, and a crossword constructor for the New York Times and Games Magazine , among other outlets. Often, Mike and Ian switch seats or feature guest answerers, such as Will Shortz, Liane Hansen, John Flansburgh and Mike Doughty. ...
 
Each month on the State of the State Podcast, professors Charles Ballard, Associate IPPSR Director Arnold Weinfeld and Director Matt Grossmann aim for a lively discussion of Michigan policy and current events. They’ll run down three or four hot topics, pointing to research on each policy issue. In the first edition, they cover income tax cuts, Detroit’s bid for Amazon’s second headquarters, and the proposal for a part-time legislature. This podcast comes to you from the Institute for Public ...
 
The podcast that takes archaeology exactly as seriously as it deserves. Two real professors of archaeology and one guy from a fake institution discuss cutting edge archaeological discoveries at a high professional level using technical knowledge and stuff. A scholarly podcast for the discerning listener, it’s handmade, artisanal, and bespoke! Critics say, “A cheeky and irreverent take,” and “the good kind of shenanigans.” Other critics say, “damaging to archaeology,” and “deeply discreditabl ...
 
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Redistricting, the prospects of inflation and the grand opening of a unique building supporting STEM education -- Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics -- at Michigan State University. Our State of the State Podcast features IPPSR Director Matt Grossmann, Associate IPPSR Director Arnold Weinfeld, Economics Professor Emeritus Charles Ball…
 
Missing basilicas, poison rats, and Trojan Horses? Holy Jerusalem earthquake Batman! Yes, that too and more in our end of summer stranger than fiction fantastic archaeology ripped from the headlines roundup episode! Our contestants are on the clock and it’s like Hollywood Squares without Paul Lynde! Or is it?…
 
First sharks and now pigs? What’s going on in Iron Age Jerusalem with all these non-kosher species? Were Judeans in the shadow of the Temple noshing on something naughty or are there other explanations? Are there ever! Our panelists' speculations are unbridled in this laughter filled episode. To learn more https://www.jpost.com/archaeology/cryptic-…
 
How soon will we see economic effects from COVID's Delta Variant? What effect will a slowing population -- as told in the U.S. Census -- have on Michigan's economy? It's all in the latest State of the State Podcast from the Institute of Public Policy and Social Research at Michigan State University. Podcasting: IPPSR Director Matt Grossmann, Associ…
 
It’s only four little letters, well maybe five, but another tiny Iron Age inscription has raised more than a few eyebrows. What’s the significance of this latest scribble? Is it the name of a biblical character, or the name of a guy who didn’t want his lunch stolen? And why are our panelists talking about being stuck in a suburban cul-de-sac? To le…
 
The ‘Gospel of Jesus’ Wife’ is the latest high profile example of a forged ancient text. Scholars should have known better, but hey, where’s the fun in that? When Fox Mulder meets Elaine Benes the sparks fly and scholarship takes it on the chin. Our panelists are there ringside, sagely opining. To learn more A Scholarly Screw-Up of Biblical Proport…
 
A bunch of 80 million year old shark teeth in Iron Age Jerusalem have set the archaeological world ablaze. What are they doing there along with 10,000 fish bones and six and a half tons of pottery? It’s gotta be a joke, right? Do our panelists speculate wildly or do they jump the shark? To learn more Cache of 80-million-year-old shark teeth found i…
 
Iron Age figurines in the Southern Levant depict naked women and not a lot else. The usual explanations are goddesses or magical devices related to fertility. But isn’t everything sort of related to fertility? What were mostly male Biblical Archaeologists missing? Probably quite a bit. Our panelists wax eloquent in this family friendly episode. To …
 
This issue of Michigan State University's State of the State Podcast warns consumers about the hazards of global counterfeiting -- especially in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Meanwhile, Michigan's awash in a budget surplus, reopening post-pandemic and finding politics somewhat boring in the new administration of President Joe Biden.…
 
Is the third millennium BCE burial mound at Tell Banat in north Syria a war memorial to the site’s defenders? What moves the living to take a random sample of human and animal bones and bury them in a mound that looms over their community? What is a kunga anyway and how does the modern sport of donkey basketball fit in? Our panelists are strangely …
 
Resurrection genomics sounds fancy, even a little scary, but in this case it means cultivating date trees from ancient seeds and then sequencing their genes. What do we learn about the antiquity of this ever-popular fruit? And if dates are so great, how come the tree is the symbol and not the fruit? Our panelists are torn, yet characteristically sw…
 
State of the State Podcasters Dr. Matt Grossmann and Arnold Weinfeld take to the air to talk loosening of COVID-19 restrictions, potential return to "normalcy" following the pandemic, COVID recovery and infrastructure investment, and the state's new voting district maps. Their guest is Suann Hammersmith, executive director of the Michigan Independe…
 
Prof. Scott Radnitz of UW joins James to discuss Russia and Vladimir Putin's influence on elections & democracy at home and abroad; potential hacking in the 2020 election; and the role that conspiracy theories play in post-Soviet politics. Scott is the author of the new book, Revealing Schemes: The Politics of Conspiracy in Russia and the Post-Sovi…
 
The chance find of a strange Roman period half lamp in Jerusalem and the even chancier discovery that the other half is in Hungary has shocked the archaeological world. What is this strange light fixture and how can its separation lead to some high-class speculation about lamps, symbolism, and ancient psychology? What is light anyway, and why is it…
 
Jake Grumbach, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Washington, joins Morgan and Nicolas to discuss the indicators and causes of American democratic backsliding. Jake is the author of a forthcoming paper entitled “Laboratories of Democratic Backsliding.” Coverage of the article, which details his development of the State De…
 
A recent study proposes that the Biblical King Solomon orchestrated maritime trade across the Iron Age Mediterranean. Is there really evidence for this? And why didn’t the kingdoms of Israel and Judah create monumental art and architecture like their neighbors? Or, for that matter, write much stuff down? Our panelists are intrigued but not confiden…
 
In the age of pandemic, IPPSR's fully vaccinated podcasters discuss vaccines, their effect on the economy and politics and how speedily misinformation and disinformation can be injected into social media. This month's lineup: Host Arnold Weinfeld, associate director of Michigan State University Institute for Public Policy and Social Research; IPPSR…
 
Wendy Wong, Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto & Nicholas Weller, Associate Professor of Political Science at UC-Riverside join James to discuss datafication, human rights, regulation of big tech, and democracy. Wendy and Nick are the authors of the forthcoming paper "We Haven’t Gone Paperless Yet: Why the Printing Press Ca…
 
A tiny inscribed potsherd dating to the first half of the 15th century BCE from Lachish in southern Israel has six little letters. Is this the earliest alphabetic inscription in the southern Levant? Does it change the story of the alphabet? And who breaks nice pottery to write a note? Our panelists are puzzled, but not necessarily surprised. To lea…
 
Jeff Paller, Assistant Prof. at the University of San Francisco, joins James and Morgan to discuss the daily interactions and informal governance that characterize and inform politics in African democracies. The conversation includes Jeff's insight regarding the influence of shifts in urbanization and demography on regional development and democrat…
 
The discovery of an industrial scale beer brewery at the early Egyptian site of Abydos demonstrates the role of alcohol in ancient societies. Was drinking your dinner on the ruler’s tab a way to keep workers fed, or maybe just to keep them from asking questions like ‘why are we building this stupid pyramid for this so-called king?’ To learn more Ab…
 
Redistricting, stimulus checks and an improving economy appear on their way to the state of Michigan and its local governments. Michigan State University's State of the State podcast cues up this month with analysis from IPPSR Director Matt Grossmann, Associate IPPSR Director Arnold Weinfeld, MSU Economics Professor Charles Ballard and podcast gues…
 
New excavations in caves along the west side of the Dead Sea have revealed fragments of Biblical texts along with astonishing prehistoric remains. They raise the question of how people were getting and out of these caves, hundreds of meters above the Dead Sea, and more importantly, why one of them brought along a basket the size of a minivan. Our p…
 
Michael Albertus, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago joins James to discuss politics and democratization in Latin America - including when/how the region gained independence, the importance of land and land reform, property rights, left-wing radicals vs. right-wing reactionaries, drug wars and cartels, and whether…
 
Ugandan political scientist Frederick Golooba-Mutebi joins James to discuss the recent election in Uganda, historical and contemporary conflict over democracy, President Yoweri Museveni's retail campaign compared to the role of social media and the rise in popularity of the opposition leader Bobi Wine, whether the January vote was rigged and who re…
 
King Seqenere of the 17th Dynasty has some gruesome head wounds. Fighting the hated Hyksos might have been the cause of death for Egypt’s version of Sonny Corleone, but what about the snoring hippos? WHAT ABOUT THE HIPPOS?! To learn more Egyptian royal mummy shows pharaoh wasn’t assassinated—he was executed https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/02/c…
 
In this special, crossover episode with the Political Economy Forum podcast, Professors Long and Menaldo are having an open, live discussion with Forum affiliates and friends on the Biden Agenda, the state of American democracy, COVID, and social media in politics. This podcast is hosted by Morgan Wack and Nicolas Wittstock and produced by Matthew …
 
Karen Ferree, Prof. at UCSD joins James to discuss what it means for voters to be ‘tribal,’ partisanship in the US, racial/ethnic voting in South Africa and Kenya, and the implications of identity to democratic politics. Karen is the author of Framing the Race in South Africa: the Political Origins of Racial Census Elections and “Mixed Records, Com…
 
Nearly a year into the pandemic coronavirus of 2020, Michigan State University's State of the State Podcasters tackle insights into the Influenza of 1918 and its parallels to current times. If we fail to learn from of lessons of the past, we are surely bound to see it repeated in our future, the broadcasters caution. Yet, we see citizens lining up …
 
Around 1000 BCE, purple dyed textiles were the in thing at the Negev copper mining site of Timna. But how did textiles dyed with purple made from Mediterranean snails get there and who wore them? Were they fit for a king or just glad rags for nomads? And how does Vandelay Industries figure in? Our contestants are frankly baffled. To learn more Bibl…
 
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